Exploding health care costs have created a health insurance affordability crisis in the United States. According to a Families USA analysis of U.S. Census Bureau data, roughly 81.8 million people under age 65, or one out of three, were without insurance for some or all of 2002 and 2003. Not only has the number of people without insurance increased, but even individuals who maintain their coverage have seen higher out-of-pocket expenses as employers and insurers have instituted additional cost-sharing mechanisms. Given the situation, it is not surprising that health care is a top priority for state policy-makers. As the 2005 legislative session begins, the search is on for solutions that will both stabilize health care spending and allow more people to access affordable insurance products.

CSG South

2004 marked the 20th anniversary of the Southern Regional Project on Infant Mortality, a joint effort by the SLC and the Southern Governors' Association. This special series report reviews the successes and failures of the past 20 years and assesses the work of the Project. It also compares statistical data on the various preventative programs and measures available in each state, and highlights the current basic government provisions used to curtail the infant death rate.

This presentation was given by Sujit M. CanagaRetna of the Southern Legislative Conference (SLC), as testimony before a Joint Hearing of the Mississippi Senate & House Finance, Appropriations and Ways & Means Committees at the Mississippi State Capitol in Jackson, Mississippi, April 27, 2005.

A vital tool for policymakers across the region, Comparative Data Reports (CDRs) offer a snapshot of conditions on a number of issues. Published annually, the CDRs track a multitude of revenue sources, appropriations levels, and performance measures in Southern states, and provide a useful tool to state government officials and staff. CDRs are available for adult correctional systems, comparative revenues and revenue forecasts, education, Medicaid, and transportation.

A vital tool for policymakers across the region, Comparative Data Reports (CDRs) offer a snapshot of conditions on a number of issues. Published annually, the CDRs track a multitude of revenue sources, appropriations levels, and performance measures in Southern states, and provide a useful tool to state government officials and staff. CDRs are available for adult correctional systems, comparative revenues and revenue forecasts, education, Medicaid, and transportation.

A vital tool for policymakers across the region, Comparative Data Reports (CDRs) offer a snapshot of conditions on a number of issues. Published annually, the CDRs track a multitude of revenue sources, appropriations levels, and performance measures in Southern states, and provide a useful tool to state government officials and staff. CDRs are available for adult correctional systems, comparative revenues and revenue forecasts, education, Medicaid, and transportation.

A vital tool for policymakers across the region, Comparative Data Reports (CDRs) offer a snapshot of conditions on a number of issues. Published annually, the CDRs track a multitude of revenue sources, appropriations levels, and performance measures in Southern states, and provide a useful tool to state government officials and staff. CDRs are available for adult correctional systems, comparative revenues and revenue forecasts, education, Medicaid, and transportation.

A vital tool for policymakers across the region, Comparative Data Reports (CDRs) offer a snapshot of conditions on a number of issues. Published annually, the CDRs track a multitude of revenue sources, appropriations levels, and performance measures in Southern states, and provide a useful tool to state government officials and staff. CDRs are available for adult correctional systems, comparative revenues and revenue forecasts, education, Medicaid, and transportation.

CSG South

This article, published in Business Xpansion Journal in April 2005, is adapted from a report issued by The Council of State Governments' Southern office, the Southern Legislative Conference (SLC), in October 2003. The article outlines the growing role of the automobile industry in the Southern states and why it continues to be a leading destination for the industry.

CSG South

This article, published in Global Corporate Xpansion Magazine in Spring 2005, is adapted from a report issued by The Council of State Governments' Southern office, the Southern Legislative Conference (SLC), in October 2003. The article outlines the growing role of the automobile industry in the Southern states and why it continues to be a leading destination for the industry.

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