Over twenty speakers will provide real-life exampes of programs and policies that make a difference for persons with opioid use disorders during a day-long Dec. 5 policy academy at the 2018 CSG National Conference in Northern Kentucky/Greater Cincinnati. The day will culminate with an audience particpation exercise for attendees to select among 19 different strategies for treatment, harm reduction, reducing demand, and limiting supply by designating theoretical spending of $10 million to $100 million on those strategies.

In March 2018 Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross issued a memorandum stating a citizenship question would be added to the 2020 census questionnaire. In In Re Department of Commerce the Supreme Court will not be deciding whether this question may be legally added. Instead, the Court will decide—among other things—whether Secretary Ross may be deposed as to his motives for adding this question.

A number of state and local governments and nonprofits sued the Secretary claiming that adding this question is arbitrary and capricious in violation of the Administrative Procedure Act.

In the 2018 memorandum Secretary Ross stated that he “began a thorough assessment” of whether to add a citizenship question “[f]ollowing receipt” of a December 2017 letter from the Department of Justice (DOJ) requesting citizenship data to enforce the Voting Rights Act’s prohibition against diluting the voting power of minority groups.

In the latest twist in Virginia’s redistricting saga, Virginia House of Delegates v. Bethune-Hill, the Supreme Court must resolve a showdown between the Virginia House of Delegates and the Virginia Attorney General regarding who may litigate the case, among many other issues.

Plaintiffs, a number of Virginia voters, allege that the Virginia legislature engaged in unconstitutional racial gerrymandering when it constructed 12 majority-black Virginia House of Delegates districts during the 2011 redistricting cycle. More specifically, the plaintiffs argue that requiring each of these districts to contain a minimum 55% black voting age population (BVAP) was unnecessary for black voters to elect their preferred candidates per the Voting Rights Act. Plaintiffs claim this minimum was set to reduce the influence of black voters in other districts.

While the public benefits of electric vehicles are becoming increasingly clear, they continue to represent only a small percentage—a little over 1 percent—of new vehicle annual sales in the United States. State legislatures have numerous strategies at their disposal they can deploy to help improve the marketplace for electric vehicles, from helping to expand electric vehicle charging access to encouraging the electrification of public fleets. California and New Hampshire are two states at different stages in their efforts to advance the electric vehicle marketplace. CSG spoke recently with two legislators who have been responsible for enacting related measures in those states.

CSG Midwest
The Pew Charitable Trusts and the Chicago-based John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation teamed up in 2010 in the “Results First Initiative” to help states implement and make use of cost-benefit analyses. The goal was (and is) to help them identify policies and programs which evidence shows are working.
CSG Midwest
Three Wisconsin law enforcement agencies are beginning a statewide experiment in getting people who commit nonviolent crimes because they’re addicted to drugs into treatment rather than prison.
CSG Midwest
Wisconsin has received federal approval of changes to its Medicaid program that include requiring work for some enrollees and charging higher premiums based on the results of a health risk assessment. The approved waiver centers on childless adults applying for and receiving coverage through the public health insurance program. According to The Washington Post, Wisconsin also had originally sought to become the first state in the nation to impose drug tests on some of its Medicaid population. This requirement did not receive federal approval.
CSG Midwest
A bipartisan deal on how to manage the nation’s water resources has potentially big implications for the Great Lakes and the region’s states — authorization of a nearly $1 billion project at the Soo Locks, movement on a plan to stop Asian carp, and more money to protect drinking water.
Signed into law in October, the Water Resources Development Act (WRDA) also establishes new programs to research the eradication of zebra mussels and Asian carp and to explore technologies that prevent harmful algal blooms in the Great Lakes.
CSG Midwest

Key developments include shifts in partisan control in one of the region's legislatures and four governor's offices, Michigan's legalization of recreational marijuana and the state's redistricting overhaul, and Nebraska's Medicaid expansion.

The number of transactions conducted with credit and debit cards has grown steadily in the United States over the last decade. Electronic transactions conducted with credit cards and debit cards increased from 27 billion in 2001 to 105 billion in 2016, an annual increase of about 19 percent.

This trend has caused U.S. governments to encourage their agencies to use electronic payment methods even as the agencies continue to accommodate cash and check payments. During the CSG 2018 National Conference in Northern Kentucky – Greater Cincinnati Dec. 6-8, CSG will release a report titled Cash-less State Governments: Electronic Collections & Benefit Disbursements.

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