Lisa Soronen

Author Articles

In a Supreme Court amicus brief in Cedar Point Nursery v. Hassid the State and Local Legal Center (SLLC) argues that temporary entry onto private property by government officials isn’t a “taking.”

The U.S. Constitution’s Fifth Amendment allows the government to “take” private property as long as it pays “...

In an unauthored opinion in Trump v. New York, the U.S. Supreme Court refused to decide whether President Trump could lawfully and constitutionally direct the Secretary of Commerce to provide information to him about the number of undocumented persons so he could exclude them from the census apportionment base. As a result, President Trump’s memorandum to this effect survives for now.

Federal law requires the Secretary of Commerce to “take a...

In Danville Christian Academy v. Beshear the U.S. Supreme Court allowed a Sixth Circuit decision to remain in place which upheld Kentucky Governor Andy Beshear’s executive order closing all K-12 schools, including religious schools, from November 18 until January 4 due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

The governor’s “school” executive order temporarily closed all elementary, middle, and high schools but allowed preschools, colleges, and...

The U.S. Supreme Court sent two cases involving limits on religious service attendance back to lower courts to reconsider in light of Roman Catholic Diocese of Brooklyn, New York v. Cuomo. In that case the Court ruled 5-4 that New York’s limits on attending religious services to 10 or 25 people while grocery stores, banks, and laundromats, etc. could admit as many people as the liked, likely violated the First Amendment. Prior to the New York case the...

In NCAA. v. Alston and AAC v. Alston the U.S. Supreme Court will decide whether the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) eligibility rules which prohibit pay-to-play violate antitrust law. The Ninth Circuit ruled against the NCAA. Numerous state legislatures have...

On Friday night the U.S. Supreme Court rejected Texas’s lawsuit challenging the results of the presidential election in Georgia, Michigan, Wisconsin, and Pennsylvania.  

Texas filed its lawsuit directly in the Supreme Court rather than in a lower court first relying on a constitutional provision giving the Supreme Court “...

In Carney v. Adams the Supreme Court held unanimously that James Adams lacked standing to challenge a Delaware constitutional provision that requires that appointments to Delaware’s major courts reflect a partisan balance.

Delaware’s Constitution states that no more than a bare majority of members of any of its five major courts may belong to any one political party. It also requires, with respect to three of those courts, that the remaining...

In a unanimous decision the U.S. Supreme Court held in Rutledge v. Pharmaceutical Care Management Association that states may regulate the price at which pharmacy benefit managers (PBMs) reimburse pharmacies for the cost of prescription drugs without violating the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA).  

PBMs act as an intermediary between prescription-drug plans and pharmacies. When a pharmacy fills a prescription the PBM reimburses...

Yesterday, in a one-sentence statement containing no recorded dissents, the U.S. Supreme Court refused to strike down Pennsylvania’s no-excuse absentee ballot scheme. December 8, 2020, was the “safe harbor” deadline for the votes of Pennsylvania’s presidential and vice-presidential electors to be included in the counting of electoral votes.

Challengers...

Over no noted dissents and without an opinion, the Supreme Court ordered a federal district court to decide again whether California may ban all indoor religious services in counties most severely hit by COVID-19. The order instructs the federal district court to reconsider this case, Harvest Rock Church v. Newsome, in light of the Supreme Court decision last week in...

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