Debra Miller

Author Articles

As states expand access to health insurance coverage under federal health reform, big questions remain about how to simultaneously improve the quality of health care and slow the growth in health costs. This session will focus on how some states have implemented innovative comprehensive programs to address these elusive policy goals.  Presenters will also provide program examples in the areas of administrative efficiencies, prevention and wellness, patient centered health homes, and payment reforms that have proven successful and are ready for replication by other states.

As states expand access to health insurance coverage under federal health reform, big questions remain about how to simultaneously improve the quality of health care and slow the growth in health costs. This session will focus on how some states have implemented innovative comprehensive programs to address these elusive policy goals.  Presenters will also provide program examples in the areas of administrative efficiencies, prevention and wellness, patient centered health homes, and payment reforms that have proven successful and are ready for replication by other states.

 

During the Council of State Governments' National Conference in Providence, Rhode Island, the CSG Health Policy Task Force hosted a roundtable discussion on December 5th looking at what’s ahead for health policy in 2011 and beyond as states prepare for full implementation of health reform in 2014.  Attendees, both public sector and private sector members, shared their ideas on health reform and other topics they wanted to see CSG focus on in future meetings and publications.

State insurance agencies are already planning for health insurance exchanges, which are due to launch in every state by January 2014. Learn the basics of how exchanges will offer insurance to individuals and small businesses that otherwise would not have access. Tailored to policymakers, this session will also identify the pressing decision points and timelines that states must address to successfully form an exchange.

State insurance agencies are already planning for health insurance exchanges, which are due to launch in every state by January 2014. Learn the basics of how exchanges will offer insurance to individuals and small businesses that otherwise would not have access. Tailored to policymakers, this session will also identify the pressing decision points and timelines that states must address to successfully form an exchange.

Today, the Wall Street Journal reported 33 governors and governors-elect sent a letter pressing the Obama administration to ease restrictions on cutting Medicaid enrollment. Under provisions of the federal health reform act, and the federal stimulus before that, states are held to “maintenance of effort” and are not allowed to roll back income eligibility levels for Medicaid.

Senator Richard Moore provides an outline of the parts of Massachusetts health reform that work to contain costs and improve quality, rebutting critics that say the state reform’s primary goal was to expand coverage. In the last slides, he highlights the tobacco cessation program began by Massachusetts Medicaid in 2005. Among Medicaid enrollees, smoking rates decreased by 26 percent.

This presentation explores why it is imperative to slow the growth in spending of Medicaid and other state health programs and why it is so hard to do so. Examples of approaches states have tried and which are the most promising are provided.

As states expand access to health insurance coverage under federal health reform, big questions remain about how to simultaneously improve health care quality and slow the growth in health costs. Some states have implemented innovative comprehensive programs to address these elusive policy goals. Presenters discussed successful examples in the areas of administrative efficiencies, prevention and wellness, patient-centered health homes and payment reforms that can easily be replicated in your state.

Three federal district judges have ruled on the constitutionality of the federal health reform law’s requirement that individuals must purchase health insurance beginning in 2014 or face a tax penalty. The first two found the law constitutional, but on December 13, 2010, Judge Henry Hudson of federal District Court in Richmond found the “individual mandate” unconstitutional. He declined to grant an injunction – which was requested by the state of Virginia – to block the government’s implementation of the law. 

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