Policy Area

Governors and legislators should develop a suite of policy options that would recognize market demand with environmental sensitivity to cost-effectively increase energy efficiency and deliver sufficient and timely clean energy resources to citizens they serve.

It is an old cliché—the only given in life is change. Not all change is bad, however painful it may be. State auditors and state comptrollers are learning to accept and embrace change as they face an evolving professional landscape that includes a new, younger work force, a plethora of new accounting and auditing standards, fluctuations in funding and leadership, and a daunting array of innovative technologies and related security threats.

State welfare caseloads in 2006 reflected the maturation of policies adopted in response to federal TANF legislation passed 10 years earlier. Caseloads continued to shrink, and many families on welfare received benefits only for the children. Significant shares of adults on welfare were exempt from work requirements due to illness or disability. Some received welfare through a time limit extension, and others were denied assistance because of a sanction. New federal rules requiring states to increase work participation will change the shape of future caseloads. States with large shares of their caseloads exempt from work requirements face the greatest challenge.

Ballot initiatives in four states sought fundamental, and in one state revolutionary, change to their judicial branch of government. All four were defeated at the polls but similar efforts are expected in the same and other states for 2008. A number of states again featured costly and ugly judicial elections. Also, it was clear that judicial candidates overwhelmingly chose to campaign within traditional expectations of what is appropriate in a fair and impartial court system. The state judicial branches in 2006 made significant strides in refining and creating methods for measuring their performance and demonstrating their accountability to the other branches of government and to the public. “High-performing courts” is one label for these efforts.

The successful renewal of the research and development (R&D) tax credit in the nation’s capital is just one of several economic development issues affecting states that continue to seek a head of steam in Congress, as supporters will try to convince the 110th Congress to make the Economic Development Act of 2005 into law. In the meantime, one state’s experience with incentives demonstrates that not all that glitters is gold.

CSG South

This report was prepared for The Council of State Governments Financial Services Working Group by Dwight V. Denison, Merl M. Hackbart, Juita-Eleana (Wie) Yusuf, and Jay H. Song of the University of Kentucky's Martin School for Public Policy and Administration.

Rapidly expanding proportions of retail- and business-related payments, traditionally made by cash and check, are now being made electronically through Automated Clearing House (ACH) or using credit or debit cards. Increasingly, the shift to electronic payments is also occurring in the public sector. The principal purpose of this study was to determine current state government acceptance and use of electronic tax and fee payments. Related purposes included an analysis of policies and procedures implemented by the states to more effectively facilitate and manage electronic payment processes.

A vital tool for policymakers across the region, Comparative Data Reports (CDRs) offer a snapshot of conditions on a number of issues. Published annually, the CDRs track a multitude of revenue sources, appropriations levels, and performance measures in Southern states, and provide a useful tool to state government officials and staff. CDRs are available for adult correctional systems, comparative revenues and revenue forecasts, education, Medicaid, and transportation.

A vital tool for policymakers across the region, Comparative Data Reports (CDRs) offer a snapshot of conditions on a number of issues. Published annually, the CDRs track a multitude of revenue sources, appropriations levels, and performance measures in Southern states, and provide a useful tool to state government officials and staff. CDRs are available for adult correctional systems, comparative revenues and revenue forecasts, education, Medicaid, and transportation.

A vital tool for policymakers across the region, Comparative Data Reports (CDRs) offer a snapshot of conditions on a number of issues. Published annually, the CDRs track a multitude of revenue sources, appropriations levels, and performance measures in Southern states, and provide a useful tool to state government officials and staff. CDRs are available for adult correctional systems, comparative revenues and revenue forecasts, education, Medicaid, and transportation.

A vital tool for policymakers across the region, Comparative Data Reports (CDRs) offer a snapshot of conditions on a number of issues. Published annually, the CDRs track a multitude of revenue sources, appropriations levels, and performance measures in Southern states, and provide a useful tool to state government officials and staff. CDRs are available for adult correctional systems, comparative revenues and revenue forecasts, education, Medicaid, and transportation.

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