Using Technology to Transform America’s Educational System to Ensure College- and Career-Readiness

In a time of continued economic stress, states are asked to increase efforts in public education. Digital learning offers a new direction for students, teachers and school districts. Opportunities exist to customize and personalize education so students receive the tools they need to engage in their instruction and become self-directed learners. Digital learning also opens the door to connect students across the state, region and nation with instructional content and practices they may not otherwise receive. This CSG Education Policy Academy provided resources to ensure students are college- and career-ready. Attendees engaged with speakers on a variety of strategic policy examples and programmatic solutions. Speakers also shared best practices and innovations through both regional and national examples.

CSG’s Center for Innovation & Transformation in Education
September 18-19, 2013
 
In a time of continued economic stress, states are asked to increase efforts in public education. Digital learning offers a new direction for students, teachers and school districts. Opportunities exist to customize and personalize education so students receive the tools they need to engage in their instruction and become self-directed learners. Digital learning also opens the door to connect students across the state, region and nation with instructional content and practices they may not otherwise receive. This CSG Education Policy Academy provided resources to ensure students are college- and career-ready. Attendees engaged with speakers on a variety of strategic policy examples and programmatic solutions. Speakers also shared best practices and innovations through both regional and national examples.
 
Presentation by Gregg Fleisher, Chief Program Officer, National Math & Science Initiative, Microsoft Corporation and Cameron Evans, U.S. Education Chief Technology Officer, Microsoft Corporation
 
Using Technology to Transform America’s Educational System to Ensure College- and Career-Readiness
 

 

Cameron Evans
As the first national technology officer and chief technology officer of Microsoft Education, Cameron Evans is responsible for shaping and executing Microsoft Corp.’s technology and policy strategy in U.S. Education. Evans chairs Microsoft’s Higher Education Advisory Group and K12 Advisory Group for connecting customer insights into Microsoft’s industry engagement. As Microsoft’s Education CTO, Evans focuses his work principally on large, complex and strategic innovation for public and private schools in K–12 and higher education, museums, libraries, research universities, and academic medical centers across the nation.

Evans is a member of Microsoft’s Education Leadership Team and is the national spokesperson for institutional innovation and transformation. Before he was named NTO and CTO in July 2009, Evans was the group sales manager for Microsoft Higher Education.

Since joining Microsoft in January 2004, Evans has served in a variety of positions, including managing the development and sales execution of account executives, technical sales specialists, industry solutions professionals, and Microsoft Certified Partners. In addition, Evans has served as the Microsoft liaison for the Schools Interoperability Framework Association. Evans continues to keynote industry conferences to connect Microsoft’s broad global and education vision with meaningful, real-world transformation.

Before joining Microsoft, Evans was a K–12 chief information officer and cabinet-level executive. Evans is a U.S. Air Force veteran. He holds a bachelor’s degree in management-computer information systems from Park University.

Gregg Fleisher
Gregg Fleisher is the Chief Academic Officer of NMSI. Gregg started his career as an auditor and actuary with Coopers & Lybrand but later decided to make a career change to pursue his passion. In 1986, he began teaching math to high school students in the Dallas ISD. While teaching, he had one of the highest percentages of students pass the Advanced Placement Program calculus exam/per school enrollment of any public high school in the country. In 1993, Gregg was awarded the AP Special Recognition Award by the Southwest Region of the College Board. In 1995, he became the lead math teacher in the new AP* Incentive Program.

During his five years as the lead math teacher, he had a strong record in helping minority students excel in AP courses. As much as 3.3 percent of the country’s minorities who passed AP Math Exams were from Gregg’s schools. In 1996, he formed his own consulting company with the goal of improving the PSAT prep program and increasing the number of National Merit Scholars in Dallas ISD. After one year, the number of National Merit Scholars doubled, and after four years, the number of students participating in the program more than tripled. In 2000, Gregg was asked by Dallas philanthropist, Peter O’Donnell, to head up Advanced Placement Strategies (APS) that manages AP Incentive programs for districts in the state of Texas. In seven years, the fledgling company grew from four to 60 employees, and had programs in hundreds of schools in the state. AP results increased significantly in each and every incentive program managed by APS, This increase was especially significant for minority students. The success of APS gave ExxonMobil cause to commit their largest grant ever to NMSI, in part to replicate APS in other states.