State Budgets 2012: Utah

Utah


To see more state budget news and information, visit State Budgets 2012

Budget Background:

  • Fiscal Year Begins: July 
  • Frequency of Legislative Cycle: Annual
  • Legislative Session for 2012:  Convened January 23, 2012
  • Frequency of Budget Cycle: Annual

Learn more from the National Association of State Budget Officers


Budget News and Information:  2012

3/27/12:  Utah Governor Approves $3B Budget for Public Schools

Gov. Gary Herbert has approved a new budget for Utah's public schools and accountability measures for teachers and administrators.  The Republican governor on Tuesday signed the last of a series of budget measures that total just over $3 billion for the next school year - a 1.3 percent increase in funding over the current school year.

One bill Herbert signed Tuesday provides more money for pre-kindergarten and optional all-daty kindergarten programs. Another makes performance pay part of salaries for school principals and administrators.  They will receive annual evaluations from local school boards based on student academic progress and other factors.

Read more:  http://www.therepublic.com/view/story/b18a46ef803e4c1797352c3dab78436e/UT--Education-Bills/

3/9/12: 2012 Utah Legislature Adjourns; Focus on Sovereignty

The Utah Legislature adjourned at midnight Thursday, after 45 days of efficient lawmaking, angry fist-shaking at the federal government, conservative cause-pushing and the meting out of more cash than the state has seen in several years.

It was an otherwise mundane session without scandal or public furor. Potentially the most volatile issue — immigration— was avoided altogether and lawmakers quickly moved to dispatch a proposal to enact a statewide ordinance banning housing and employment discrimination against gays and lesbians.

In the $13 billion budget, which saw about $440 million in new spending, lawmakers were good to education, law enforcement, state employees and social services.

But it was the state sovereignty-palooza, including Utah’s Sagebrush Rebellion 2.0, that garnered the most attention, as lawmakers sought to stake a claim to 30 million acres of federal land in the state with an eye toward instigating a court fight.

Read more:  http://www.sltrib.com/sltrib/politics/53680490-90/federal-state-utah-legislature.html.csp

 

3/3/12:  Legislative Leaders Finalizing Utah Budget

Utah legislative leaders have finalized a $13 billion budget proposal that will go to lawmakers Monday without raising taxes or cutting funding for state agencies.

For the most part, the primary goals for legislators of boosting education funding, giving raises to public employees and covering the growth in Medicaid have been accomplished, House Speaker Becky Lockhart, R-Provo, said.

Although the state had a $400 million surplus, the vast majority of that was essentially allocated at the beginning of the session because of those priorities. Leaders also committed to reducing the state's debt load and provide ongoing funding for some programs that currently have to make new requests every year.

Read more:  

http://www.heraldextra.com/news/state-and-regional/utah/legislative-leaders-finalizing-utah-budget/article_a28dc86e-ae7e-5051-9313-e32b09a2afe8.html


Budget News and Information:  Previous Budget Cycles

3/28/11:  Scheduled budget cuts reduced to 2 percent

The end of the 2011 Utah general legislative session brought good news for Utah State students and faculty. Significantly lowered budget cuts, ongoing funding for USU's new veterinary medicine Ph.D. program and a pending grant for a new business building were all included in the session's final outcome.

Read MoreThe Utah Statesman 


3/8/11: Key budget bill headed to Herbert's desk

The Legislature passed a key budget bill Tuesday, adding back all but 1 percent of the 7 percent in cuts made earlier in the sessionSB2, sponsored by Senate Budget Chairman Lyle Hillyard, R-Logan, was approved by both the Senate and the House and now goes to Gov. Gary Herbert for his action on the estimated $12 billion spending plan. Some areas of state government including higher education will see spending sliced by 2 percent or more, but public education emerged not only intact but with additional funds for enrollment growth.

Read more: Deseret News