State Budgets 2012: New Hampshire

 

New Hampshire


To see more state budget news and information, visit State Budgets 2012

Budget Background:

  • Fiscal Year Begins: July 
  • Frequency of Legislative Cycle: Annual
  • Legislative Session for 2012: Convened January 4, 2012 
  • Frequency of Budget Cycle: Biennial

Learn more from the National Association of State Budget Officers


Budget News and Information: 2012 

 

Final Version: NH State Budget FY 2012 – FY 2013

 


 

4/16/12: N.H. plan to shut off streetlights has towns worried

Southern New Hampshire officials say they have been left in the dark about the state's plan to shut off hundreds of streetlights across the Granite State. Nearly three-quarters of the lights illuminating state roads will be turned off to save money, according to William Boynton, spokesman for the New Hampshire Department of Transportation.

Read More: Eagle-Tribune


2/15/12: NH proposal would limit ability to raise taxes

New Hampshire’s Senate is considering a constitutional amendment that would limit state spending. The Senate votes Wednesday whether to send the proposed constitutional amendment to the House. The House-passed version of the amendment would require 60 percent of lawmakers to vote in favor of bills to borrow or raise taxes. The Senate is looking at instead limiting spending increases to the rate of inflation and the increase in population.

Read More: Boston.com

 


Budget News and Information: Previous Budget Cycles  

 

6/15/11: NH budget talks break off

Budget talks between the New Hampshire House and Senate broken off Wednesday night just when it appeared a tentative agreement was close to being finalized.

Read More: Boston.com


 

6/12/11: NH budget negotiators working against deadline

House and Senate budget negotiators are working against a deadline to reach a compromise on a $10.3 billion budget for New Hampshire for the two years beginning July 1.

Read More: Boston.com


 

6/9/11: Negotiations begin over NH budget

House and Senate budget negotiators have agreed on how much they plan to spend in New Hampshire's budget for the two years beginning July 1, yet made no decisions on the spending differences they face.

Read More: Boston.com


 

6/2/11: NH Senate passes $10B budget package

New Hampshire's Senate passed a $10.3 billion budget package that sets the stage for negotiations with the House over a compromise plan where the biggest spending differences are on services for the mentally ill and disabled.

Read More: Bloomberg Businessweek


3/16/11: Mental health officials: Cuts proposed would be 'devastating'

Cuts to mental health services proposed in the state budget for the next biennium have received backlash from those in the profession.

Read More: Foster's Daily Democrat


3/14/11: NH House to vote on proposed constitutional change

A constitutional amendment to reverse a landmark 1997 New Hampshire Supreme Court ruling is scheduled for a vote this week.

The amendment sponsored by Republican House Speaker William O'Brien would give lawmakers full discretion to decide how much, if anything, to pay in school aid. O'Brien argues the court stripped away local control over education by shifting responsibility to the state.

Read More: Foster's Daily Democrat


3/15/11: $209 million slasged from HHS budget

The House Finance Committee yesterday took a carefully wielded ax to the Department of Health and Human Services budget.

Read More: Concord Monitor


3/10/11: NH gov’s $11B budget proposal gets hearing

Hundreds crowded the New Hampshire House chamber Thursday and delivered sometimes strong and fearful testimony while pleading with lawmakers not to cut state services for the disabled and elderly in the upcoming two-year budget.

Read more: Bloomberg Businessweek


2/16/11: Governor Lynch Unveils FY 2012-13 New Hampshire Budget

Governor John Lynch has presented a balanced, sustainable and fiscally responsible budget that lowers the state’s cost structure below spending in 2008-2009 and cuts programs, offices and personnel to ensure state government can meet its core responsibilities.

Read more: Gov Monitor