Diabetes: A Costly Epidemic

Nineteen million people in the United States had been diagnosed with type I or type II diabetes in 2010, although the number of people diagnosed varies by region.1 Diabetes costs the U.S. $245 billion in 2012 in both direct and indirect costs.2 Costs associated with diabetes also vary by region. Direct costs include such things as hospital or nursing home stays, ambulance services and home health services, as well as insulin and other diabetic supplies and treatments, while indirect medical costs refer to absenteeism, unemployment and reduced productivity.

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National Analysis

  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimated 7 million people had prediabetes in 2010.3
  • In 2010, 8 percent of the population over age 18 was diagnosed with diabetes in the U.S.4
  • The number of people diagnosed with diabetes grew 82 percent from 1995 to 2010.5
  • In 2011, 10 percent of adults had previously been told by a doctor that they have diabetes.6
  • As the nation’s population ages, more people are being diagnosed with diabetes.

    • The CDC estimates 27 percent of people age 65 and older have the disease.
    • 14 percent of people ages 45 to 64 have diabetes.
    • People ages 20 to 44 are the least likely to have diabetes. An estimated 4 percent of people in this age group have the disease.7
  • Racial and ethnic health disparities exist in the prevalence of diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes. In 2010, 19 percent of African-Americans and 10 percent of whites over age 20 had diabetes.8

Regional Analysis:

  • Diagnosed diabetes prevalence in 2010 varied in the Eastern region from 6 percent in Vermont to 9 percent in Pennsylvania.9
  • In 2010, the Eastern states with the highest diagnosed diabetes prevalence after Pennsylvania were Maryland and New Jersey, both slightly less than 9 percent.
  • The growth in diagnosed diabetes in Eastern states between 1995 and 2010 ranged from 27 percent in Vermont to 117 percent in Maine.
  • After Maine, the states where diabetes increased the most between 1995 and 2010 are Maryland with a 102 percent increase and New York with a 91 percent increase.
  • In a 2013 report, the American Diabetes Association estimated the total annual costs of diabetes in 2010 ranged from $370 million in Vermont to $16 billion in New York.10
  • After New York, states with top total cost estimates in 2010 were Pennsylvania at $10 billion and New Jersey at $7 billion.

  • Diagnosed diabetes prevalence in 2010 varied in the Midwestern region from 6 percent in South Dakota to 10 percent in Michigan.9
  • In 2010, the Midwestern states with the highest diagnosed diabetes prevalence after Michigan were Indiana and Ohio, both slightly more than 9 percent.
  • The growth in diagnosed diabetes in Midwestern states between 1995 and 2010 ranges from 36 percent in Iowa to 121 percent in both Ohio and South Dakota.
  • After Ohio and South Dakota, the states where diabetes increased the most between 1995 and 2010 are Minnesota with a 106 percent increase and North Dakota with a 92 percent increase.
  • In a 2013 report, the American Diabetes Association estimated the total annual cost of diabetes in 2010 ranged from $410 million in North Dakota to $9 billion in Ohio.10
  • After Ohio, states with top total cost estimates in 2010 were Illinois at $8 billion and Michigan at $8 billion.

 
  • Every state in the Southern region, diabetes prevalence is above the national median.
  • Diagnosed diabetes prevalence varied in the Southern region from 8 percent in Virginia to 12 percent in Mississippi.9
  • In 2010, the Southern states with the highest diagnosed diabetes prevalence after Virginia were Alabama and Tennessee, both at 11 percent.
  • The growth in diagnosed diabetes in Southern states between 1995 and 2010 ranged from 46 percent in Louisiana to 227 percent in Oklahoma.
  • In a 2013 report, the American Diabetes Association estimated the total annual costs of diabetes in 2010 ranged from $2 billion in West Virginia to more than $18 billion in Florida.10
  • After Florida, states with top total cost estimates in 2010 were Texas at $18 billion and North Carolina at $8 billion.

 

  • In all but one state in the Western region, diabetes prevalence is below the national median.
  • Diagnosed diabetes prevalence varied in the Western region from 6 percent in Alaska to nearly 9 percent in California.9
  • In 2010, the Western states with the highest diagnosed diabetes prevalence after California were Nevada and Idaho, both at 8 percent.
  • The growth in diagnosed diabetes in Western states between 1995 and 2010 ranged from 38 percent in California to 136 percent in Washington.
  • In a 2013 report, the American Diabetes Association estimated the costs of diabetes ranged from $360 million in Wyoming to $27.5 billion in California in 2010.10
  • After California, states with top cost estimates were Washington at $5.1 billion and Arizona at slightly more than $4.7 billion.

 

References:

1 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Nov. 16, 2012, Vol. 16, No.45 
3 CDC. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report
4 CDC. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report
5 CDC. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report
7 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National Diabetes Fact Sheet 2011
8 CDC. National Diabetes Fact Sheet 2011.
9 CDC. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report
10 American Diabetes Association.
 

Diabetes: A Costly Epidemic

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east_diabetes.pdf469.82 KB
south_diabetes.pdf494.43 KB
midwest_diabetes.pdf489.99 KB
west_diabetes.pdf623.62 KB