sexual harassment

CSG Midwest
In late October, an open letter detailing “#MeToo” stories in Illinois government became part of the larger national story about sexual misconduct, discrimination and harassment. “Ask any woman who has lobbied the halls of the Capitol, staffed Council Chambers, or slogged through brutal hours on the campaign trail,” the letter begins. “Misogyny is alive and well in this industry.”
It then recounts specific stories of unwanted sexual advances, crude jokes, and inappropriate texts and comments. “Illinois deserves responsible stewards of power. Let’s demand better,” concludes the letter, signed by more than 300 legislators, lobbyists, staffers and policymakers.
It didn’t take long for the General Assembly to respond.
Because of the timing of the letter, the national #MeToo movement and a fall veto session, Illinois became one of the first states to pass legislation in the wake of the heightened awareness about sexual discrimination and harassment.

Title VII allows prevailing employers in frivolous Title VII employment discrimination lawsuits to collect a reasonable attorney’s fee. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) brings lawsuits on behalf of aggrieved employees. But before doing so it has a statutory obligation to investigate, find reasonable cause the employer violated Title VII, and conciliate the dispute.

On Monday the Supreme Court heard oral argument in CRST Van Expedited v. EEOC where it will decide whether an employer is a prevailing party where a court dismissed a Title VII case because the EEOC failed to meet its pre-lawsuit obligations.