Ohio

CSG Midwest

Indiana Gov. Eric Holcomb signed a sweeping gambling expansion into law in May, legalizing sports betting at the state’s casinos and “racinos” (racetracks with casino games), as well as on mobile devices.

CSG Midwest

Few if any U.S. states have been hit harder than Ohio by the crushing rise in drug use, abuse and overdose deaths. That state’s rate of overdose deaths was second in the nation in 2017: 46.5 per 100,000. Behind those numbers, too, are tragic stories that have personally touched many Ohio legislators — and helped lead their ongoing search for policy solutions.

“For multiple years, multiple general assemblies, it has been a legislative priority,” says Ohio Sen. Jay Hottinger, a member of the General Assembly since 1995. “If you wrote just a paragraph on each bill, it would be about 17 or 18 pages.”
He was a sponsor of one of Ohio’s most recently passed bills — last year’s SB 119, known as Daniel’s law in honor of a young Ohio man who died from an opioid overdose after years of fighting addiction. Daniel Weidle had found success in his fight through the use of naltrexone (one of the medications federally approved for treatment of opioid-use disorder), but after losing his provider, Daniel got turned down several times in trying to refill his prescription.
CSG Midwest
The opioid crisis in Ohio has made the need for foster care families greater than ever, and the state launched a new website and public awareness campaign in January to get more children placed in safe, loving homes. Ohio has nearly 16,000 children in the custody of county children services agencies. Since 2013, the number of children entering the state’s foster care system has risen 24 percent. Many of these individuals are quite young —17 percent of the foster care population is under 12 months of age and 35 percent is 3 years old and younger.
CSG Midwest
In October, the Trump Administration adopted new rules for short-term (or “skinny”) health insurance plans. Since then, some states have weighed in by adopting new rules of their own, while also reminding insurers that they must still comply with state-level regulations.
CSG Midwest
Two Midwestern states announced plans this fall to do more to prevent elder abuse. In Ohio, a new $1.3 million project will seek to raise public awareness, create an online referral system to report abuse, and establish new county-level collaborations. Much of the money for this new initiative is coming from a federal grant. This year, too, Ohio has expanded its mandatory-reporter law. Under HB 49, which took effect in September, many more individuals must report cases of elder abuse or face fines. The list of mandatory reporters now includes pharmacists, certified public accountants, financial planners, real estate agents and first-responders, among others.

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