economic development

CSG Midwest
As of early March, Wisconsin was set to become one of the first states in the nation to expand incentives for private investments in federally designated Opportunity Zones. Under AB 532, which passed with bipartisan support in the Assembly and Senate, Wisconsin would double the tax credits for investors supporting projects in financially strapped, low-income communities across the state. (The bill had not yet been signed by the governor as of early March.)
CSG Midwest
In Kansas City’s metropolitan area, there is a long history of businesses crossing the Kansas-Missouri border — lured by one of the two states’ tax breaks and financial incentives. “It’s a zero-sum game when incentives are given to move a company just a few miles from where it was,” says Rep. Kristey Williams, a member of the Kansas House Commerce, Labor and Economic Development Committee. “Essentially, taxpayers lose.”
Could this traditional type of interstate competition be replaced by an interstate collaboration, or cease-fire?
Smaller- and large-scale ideas were being proposed in the nation’s state legislatures in early 2019, including a bill known as the “border war bill” in Missouri. Passed by the state Senate in late February, SB 182 would prohibit state incentives from being offered to companies located in four Kansas border counties. Kansas would have to adopt a comparable ban for SB 182 to take effect.
According to Missouri Sen. Mike Cierpot, the bill’s sponsor, the two states have “spent over $335 million shuffling businesses back and forth over state lines … by moving a matter of miles, or in some cases blocks.”
CSG Midwest
Recent headlines have pointed to some of the strains (a mix of new tensions and a flare-up of longstanding conflicts) in the U.S.-Canada relationship. There have been proposed U.S. tariffs on steel, harsh words exchanged on Canadian dairy policy, and threats by President Donald Trump to end the North American Free Trade Agreement.
But dig a little deeper, and a much different story emerges — one of economic interdependence and cooperation in key areas such as energy and the environment.
“The relationship at the provincial-state level is probably as strong, if not stronger, than it has been since the mid-1980s,” says Carlo Dade, director of the Canada West Foundation’s Trade and Investment Centre, pointing, in particular, to the deeper relations built between state governors and provincial premiers.
Canada and the United States share much more than the largest binational border in the world; their peaceful relationship has contributed to economic growth in both countries as well as to the development of an intricate, integrated trading partnership.
“We are moving away from just being trading partners; now we are business associates that build things together and sell the finished products both domestically and around the world,” notes Christopher Sands, director of the Canadian Studies Program at the School of Advanced International Studies at Johns Hopkins University.
This thriving cross-border supply chain is one of several critical pieces of the U.S.-Canada relationship, and much of it is centered in the Midwest.
CSG Midwest
In September, Amazon announced its search for a second North American corporate headquarters, known as HQ2. The scale and scope of the project — the e-commerce giant is expected to invest more than $5 billion in the facility and employ up to 50,000 high-paid workers — captured not only headlines, but the attention of state and local officials.
A very public competition has ensued, and at least one Midwestern state, Illinois, is right in the middle of it.
“I’m excited about our chances for [landing] HQ2,” Illinois Rep. Mike Zalewski says. Earlier this year, he was part of an effort to reform and reinstate a long-standing Illinois incentives program known as EDGE, which is among the programs that the state could use in its pursuit.
“For every Amazon, there’s a lot more 40- or 50-person manufacturers looking to move to Illinois or to grow their business [here], and we want them to succeed,” Zalewski says. “EDGE is designed ... to help both the big fries and the small fries.”
The role of state incentives (tax credits, tax exemptions, grants, low-interest loans, etc.) has gotten increased attention in the Midwest during the latter part of 2017. In September, around the same time Illinois began making its Amazon pitch, Wisconsin was closing the deal on what lawmakers say is the biggest economic development project in that state’s history.

CSG Midwest
Using a site where B-24 bombers were made during World War II in a factory built by Henry Ford, Michigan hopes to build on its heritage as a hub of automotive manufacturing and innovation and become the world’s leader in autonomous vehicle technology.
In July, citing the creation of more and better jobs in the state’s thriving automotive industry, Gov. Rick Snyder announced the approval of $17 million in startup funds for the creation of the American Center for Mobility in Ypsilanti.

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