E-Newsletter

The bad news is a lot of people across the country can’t get access to appropriate and timely dental care. The good news is state policymakers can help improve the situation.
That was the...

CHICAGO—Paul Patrick, the deputy division director of the Utah Department of Health, is eager to begin the enactment of an agreement that would recognize emergency medical services personnel from state to state.

“This is probably the greatest step forward for state EMS offices,” said Patrick. “It will bring EMS on par with other health care professions in recognition of the training and experience of its...

As states continue to diversify their energy portfolios, renewable energy sources—like solar technology—will play an increasing role.
A recent report by the U.S. Energy Information...

Alan C. Walker, secretary of the Pennsylvania Department of Community and Economic Development, knows the importance of connecting a good education with economic development. “(N)othing is more critical to ensuring the economic strength of Pennsylvania and to securing good-paying jobs for Pennsylvanians than the development of a well-educated and trained workforce,” said Walker, who has been invited to speak at The Council of State Governments’ policy academy, “U.S. Workforce Development: Building Capacity at Home,” during the 2014 CSG National/CSG West Annual Conference in Anchorage, Alaska, in August. Pennsylvania’s workforce development efforts target businesses that might move jobs overseas as well as global companies looking for a U.S. location. Insourcing is the practice of building facilities in the United States and hiring Americans rather than basing operations abroad, according to Investopedia.

Shortfalls in state-run retirement systems continue to grow and in fiscal year 2012, the gap between promises to state workers and funding reached $915 billion. “Many states are facing rising costs to pay for pension obligations and unfunded liabilities for future pension costs that are squeezing other budget priorities,” said Adrian Moore, vice president of the Reason Foundation.

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