E-Newsletter

Michigan Rep. Phil Cavanagh won’t say that public service is in his blood—even though he comes from a long line of public servants, including his father, who served as mayor of Detroit from 1962 to 1970....
Last year may have been a big year for transportation issues, but this year’s elections are keeping states from making too many changes on the infrastructure front.
That was the message...

After a community faces a violent tragedy—like Sandy Hook, Conn., or Aurora, Colo., or Tucson, Ariz.—members of the community and policymakers alike are thirsty for solutions. One program many communities are looking to is Mental Health First Aid.

The cost of health care in the United States has grown an average of 2.4 percent faster than the gross domestic product since 1970; it now represents 18 percent of the total GDP, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation. One challenge contributing significantly to these costs is access to health care in hard-to-serve locations. Problems accessing care is especially common in rural areas. According to the American Academy of Family Physicians, 21 percent of the U.S. population lives in rural areas, but only 11 percent of medical specialists practice in those areas. This results in a significant segment of the population that is frequently underserved. One possible solution is a series of medical licensing compacts intended to reduce existing barriers to the process of gaining licensure in multiple states.

Human trafficking is often described as a form of modern-day slavery through which individuals are exploited through force, fraud or coercion for labor service or commercial sex acts. State legislatures are leading the response to this fast-growing crime, according to Britanny Vanderhoof, policy counsel for the Polaris Project, a national anti-human trafficking advocacy organization. “States have really taken up the issue of human trafficking as a state issue,” she said during a recent webinar, “Human Trafficking: State Responses to Modern-Day Slavery,” presented by CSG South.

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