2013 CSG National Conference

Three out of every four dollars spent for health care is spent on chronic diseases. For state budgets, the drain is even greater—Medicaid spends 83 cents of every dollar on chronic diseases. This CSG Health Policy Academy focused on chronic diseases, their burden to society and evidence-based strategies for prevention, identification and treatment. Whether it is heart disease, mental health, diabetes, Alzheimer’s disease or Hepatitis C, considerable research suggests we can do better for those with these often devastating diseases while also being better stewards of state budgets. State policy strategies were presented to meet the dual goals of improving health outcomes and reducing health care spending.

Three out of every four dollars spent for health care is spent on chronic diseases. For state budgets, the drain is even greater—Medicaid spends 83 cents of every dollar on chronic diseases. This CSG Health Policy Academy focused on chronic diseases, their burden to society and evidence-based strategies for prevention, identification and treatment. Whether it is heart disease, mental health, diabetes, Alzheimer’s disease or Hepatitis C, considerable research suggests we can do better for those with these often devastating diseases while also being better stewards of state budgets. State policy strategies were presented to meet the dual goals of improving health outcomes and reducing health care spending.

At the recently concluded National Conference held in Kansas City, Missouri, the CSG Executive Committee approved ten policy resolutions on a wide range of topics, including transportation funding, domestic energy security, international trade and export promotion, obesity, unmanned aircraft systems, amendments to the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act, and tax exemptions for municipal bond interest. 

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act vastly impacted every aspect of health care marketplaces in the United States. Since March 2010 when President Barack Obama signed the ACA into law, states, health insurers, hospitals, doctors, patients and employers have raised a variety of questions in an effort to understand what is expected and how it will affect them. U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius has played a central role in the development and implementation of the law. Sebelius, a former Kansas governor, discussed the role of states in health care reform implementation and next steps they’ll need to take.

Maine Superintendent of Instruction Don Siviski says he apologizes to every large group he talks to because education was getting it wrong when they were in school.

“We had this fixed mindset where your IQ didn’t change,” Siviski said at Saturday’s “Education Reform: Fact or Fiction?” session. “We put you into ability groups because we were nice to you. We tracked you. … (We) limited your aspirations. … We just destroyed kids’ dreams.

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