Insurance Coverage and Medical Care

On November 3, the House voted to extend federal funding for the Children’s Health Insurance, or CHIP, program, passing the measure with a 242-174 bipartisan vote. But the bill also must pass in the Senate before it can take effect, so many states will likely run out of money before they receive any new CHIP funds.

Today Seema Verma, administrator for the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), spoke to the state Medicaid directors at their fall conference in Washington, D.C. She outlined her vision for the future of Medicaid and unveiled a number of new CMS policies during that speech and in this press release. She pledged to give states more freedom to design innovative programs and to remove federal impediments that stand in the way of states.

Maine voters will have a chance to vote on Nov. 7, 2017, whether to expand Medicaid coverage to an estimated 70,000 Mainers under the age of 65 with incomes below or equal to 138 percent of the federal poverty level. This is exactly the Medicaid expansion provision included in the Affordable Care Act.

In Virginia, the November ballot impact on health care is a little less direct, but is also being watched by political observers. All 100 House of Delegate seats are up for election. If the Democrats pick up a number of seats the legislature could approve Medicaid expansion, bringing health care insurance to 400,000 low income Virginians.

With insurance coverage for 8.9 million children hanging in the balance, states have been anxiously waiting to find out if federal funding will be extended for the Children’s Health Insurance Program, or CHIP. In early October, bills have passed out of committee in both the House and Senate to extend federal funding through 2022 for CHIP and other related programs. Both bills would extend CHIP funding and maintain the 23-percentage-point increase in the enhanced federal matching rate through FY 2019.

CSG Midwest
Some notable trends in poverty, health insurance and household income in the Midwest were revealed in recently released U.S. Census Bureau data.

President Trump signed an executive order today that will allow businesses and individuals to buy association health plans that will not have to comply with the Affordable Care Act. See the official White House release about the provisions of the executive order here

The Georgetown University Center on Health Insurance Reforms has released a...

President Trump signed an executive order today that will allow businesses and individuals to buy association health plans that will not have to comply with the Affordable Care Act. See a video of the signing ceremony at the White House here. Read Washington Post coverage...

Today, NBC news published a report that President Trump has said he is about to sign an executive order to allow Americans to purchase health insurance policies across state lines. The ACA already has a provision for selling insurance across state lines so long as the plans meet certain minimum standards of coverage and five states have such laws on the books already. However, no insurer currently sells such policies.

Remember that after the Affordable Care Act passed, numerous commentators predicted that increased insurance coverage, achieved through purchase of individual plans through the ACA marketplace or expanded Medicaid coverage, would precipitate a primary care shortage? Experts feared that those with new coverage would not actually have access to care and those previously insured might experience decreased access to primary care. Studies have shown that primary care availability hasn’t suffered as expected.

Remember that after the Affordable Care Act passed, numerous commentators predicted that increased insurance coverage, achieved through purchase of individual plans through the ACA marketplace or expanded Medicaid coverage, would precipitate a primary care shortage? Experts feared that those with new coverage would not actually have access to care and those previously insured might experience decreased access to primary care. Studies have shown that primary care availability hasn’t suffered as expected.

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