Aging and Disabilities

A high-performing system of long-term care services and supports must address four critical dimensions: affordability/access; choice of setting/provider; quality of life and care; and support for family caregivers. A recent scorecard assessed the states on 25 indicators within these dimensions and found marked differences in performance. States can use these findings to target system improvements.

Chapter 9 of the 2012 Book of the States contains the following articles and tables:

Book of the States 2012

Chapter 9: Selected State Policies and Programs

Articles:

  1. Elections, Greater Federal Grant Scrutiny and Ongoing Disasters Continue to Test Management System
  2. ...

CSG state policy profiles on sexual health and prevention provide the latest statistics for each state and Puerto Rico on HIV/AIDS, sexually transmitted infections and teen pregnancy.

But more significantly, the profiles provide answers to the question "what can be done?" Effective state policies recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are highlighted. Each state's profile reviews whether policies have been implemented in line with these recommendations.

The CSG state profiles are the place for state decision makers to get up-to-date statistics and analysis of research-proven state actions to prevent HIV/AIDS, STIs and teen pregnancy.

Oregon was the first state to use iPads for voting in the past election cycle, and in doing so it bolstered its reputation as a trend-setter among the states in elections.  Oregon was also the first state to allow all residents to conveniently vote by mail.  The iPads were used in limited applications during this cycle--only 5 were used on loan from Apple, Inc.  The reason for the limited roll out is because Oregon is trying a new experiement: using tablets to help disabled citizens vote by having the polls come to them.

Anyone remember the TV episode of “West Wing” where the White House staff of President Bartlet debate the political fallout of developing a new, better poverty definition?

Today, the U.S. Census Bureau released national data using a new formula based on recommendations of a National Academy of Sciences expert panel.

The bottom line: 16 percent of Americans (49.1 million) are poor according to the new measure compared to 15.2 percent according to the old measure, which will continue to be the official poverty measure for the time being. The new measure also documented a rise in poverty between 2009 and 2010, from 15.3 to 16 percent, as was also reported under the official definition.

Legislators from across the country and other key stakeholders attended the Health Policy Academy on Aging and Alzheimer’s disease, held on October 19, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the CSG National Conference & North American Summit in Bellevue, Washington. Speakers outlined the growing burden of Alzheimer’s disease, the state of the science around prevention, diagnosis and treatment of the disease and states’ policy responses to the issues of aging and Alzheimer’s disease.

Manny Najera had seen the effects of Alzheimer’s firsthand when he was caring for his aging mother, who suffered from the disease.

When he was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s last year at age 75, Najera wasn’t surprised.

 “I was at a different plateau than your usual person who was told you have Alzheimer’s,” he said.

As a former Texas state legislator, he knew from whence he spoke to those attending an all-day Health Policy Academy on Alzheimer’s disease Wednesday. He believes it’s important for policymakers...

The Council of State Governments invites you to attend Aging and Alzheimer's Disease: Emerging Issues and Policy Solutions, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 19, at the Hyatt Regency Bellevue in Bellevue, Wash. The session will immediately precede the CSG National Conference and North American Summit, scheduled for Oct. 19-23. 

Relief for seniors buying prescription drug coverage under Medicare who fall into the so-called donut hole has reached more than $460 million so far this year. The Affordable Care Act has provided almost 900,000 Americans an average benefit of $513.

States like California and New York saw a real boost to their economies as $45 million and $35 million was available to cover prescription drug costs for seniors on Medicare. Presumably, this supplemental coverage freed up millions of dollars for seniors to pay other bills.

Three out of four people with Alzheimer's disease will end up in a nursing home unless better systems of community care and support are built in states. Even without robust systems, today, nearly 15 million caregivers provide care valued at $202 billion. 

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