Energy

CSG Midwest
Opposition to a proposed pipeline that would bring more oil from Canada to refineries around the United States has come from many directions since being introduced more than a decade ago. Landowners and Native American tribes along the route have fought the Keystone XL proposal. Environmental groups have said it would trample on sensitive land, endanger water resources and enlarge the nation’s carbon footprint.
For many years, the state of Nebraska has been at the center of this political and legal fight. But it may now be over in the Cornhusker State, as the result of a ruling this summer by the Nebraska Supreme Court affirming a 2017 Public Service Commission decision to OK a pipeline route.
CSG Midwest
Before they voted to legalize the use of recreational marijuana, legislators in Illinois committed to learning as much as possible from the experiences of other states. Rep. Kelly Cassidy, lead sponsor of the bill signed into law in June (HB 1438), and others spent two years visiting growers, processors and dispensaries across the United States; they also held more than 100 stakeholder meetings in the state.
The end result: a 600-plus-page bill much different than any other state’s law on marijuana legalization. For example, the bill focuses heavily on ensuring diversity in ownership of the new businesses that come from legalization, and investing in the communities and people disproportionately impacted by enforcement of the state’s old laws on cannabis. But another facet of the new law stands out as well, and reflects what lawmakers found in their fact-finding work prior to the bill’s introduction. “[We were] struck by the intensive power and water usage involved in growing marijuana,” Cassidy says. In response, lawmakers included environmental requirements and efficiency standards for those seeking a license to cultivate marijuana.

CSG Midwest
The mix of electric power generation has changed dramatically over the past decade or so in much of the 11-state Midwest — more wind power and more natural gas plants, for example, and much less reliance on coal. Will the shift be even more dramatic in the years ahead?
That is the vision laid out in new legislative proposals this year in states such as Illinois and Minnesota, as well as in recent plans unveiled by some utility companies themselves.
CSG Midwest
Michigan Sen. Curt VanderWall calls it the “most scrutinized pipeline in the nation.” And whatever one thinks the state should do about the future of Line 5 ­­— which is located under the Straits of Mackinac and carries up to 540,000 barrels of oil and natural gas liquids every day — it’s hard to disagree with the observation. Built in 1953, the twin pipelines have been called a “sunken hazard” that put the “Great Lakes at risk of a catastrophic oil pipeline rupture.”
But VanderWall and others note that Michigan relies on the energy supplies being shipped via Line 5. He says, for example, that most of the propane used in the Upper Peninsula comes from the 645-mile pipeline, which starts in Wisconsin, goes under the Straits, and then winds through Michigan before reaching Ontario.
“To get the same supplies by truck, you’d need 2,400 trucks doing it every day, nonstop,” says VanderWall, a member of the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Legislative Caucus Executive Committee. “The pipeline is the safest way to transport the oil. We need to make it safer.”
The state’s policy solution, at least for now, is this: Allow Line 5 to continue to operate for another few years, under enhanced inspections. Meanwhile, begin construction on a utility tunnel, located up to 100 feet beneath the lakebed, that would secure a new pipeline.
Climate Adaptation

Alternative energy has consistently improved over the years. Wind, solar, geothermal, and hydroelectricity technology have gradually made their mark in America’s energy production as producers and consumers look for alternatives to fossil fuels. State governments have been increasingly mandating alternative energy goals and implementation of alternative energy sources where feasible – 30 states have alternative energy mandates and eight states have voluntary requirements. Now, the Environmental Protection Agency’s decreased...

Climate Adaptation

As the electric vehicle (EV) market expands in the United States, utilities are going to play a central role by increasing access to critical charging infrastructure and minimizing the potential grid impacts of the new load created by new concentration of EVs, among other things.

That was one of the key points highlighted in a new report,...

The Council of State Governments hosted its 2018 National Conference from Dec. 5th - Dec. 8th in Northern Kentucky/Greater Cincinnati.

The meeting provided state leaders with a full agenda structured to tackle some of the most pressing issues facing state governments. If you would like to review the agendas and speakers, or get copies of the presentations and related materials, please

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During the 2018 CSG National Conference in Northern Kentucky-Greater Cincinnati, attendees will have the opportunity to hear from energy experts on how widespread electrification can impact the U.S. power system and the broader economy. This session will be held on Friday, December 7 from 8-9:30 a.m.

Customer adoption of electric end-use technologies, including electric vehicles, heat pumps for space and water heating, and electric technologies in industry and heavy transportation, is expected to spur steady...

Climate Adaptation

There are 1 million electric vehicles (EVs) on U.S. roads today and more are expected to come. Every major automaker has made big commitments to EVs, with plans to bring at least one EV model to the market in the next few years. According to the Edison Electric Institute and the Institute for Electric Innovation, more than 7 million plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) are expected to hit U....

CSG Midwest
A summertime ban on E15 sales may soon be eliminated by the federal government, a move expected to help the Midwest’s corn producers and ethanol industry. In October, President Donald Trump directed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to initiate a rulemaking process that allows for year-round sales.

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