Education

Issue: Factors like the decline of brick-and-mortar retail and rise of e-commerce in recent years have produced a transformation of the nation’s supply chain that is impacting multiple modes of transportation from trucking to rail to ports and airports. Those states that have been most successful in attracting elements of the new logistics economy have demonstrated the ability to tout key infrastructure assets, invest where necessary and enact programs to ensure they will have the workforce in place to serve this sector. As innovative companies like Amazon continue to expand their footprint in the years ahead, these efforts are likely to become even more important for those logistics leaders and the other states that hope to compete with them.  

Innovation Classroom sessions provide the opportunity to demonstrate new and cutting edge technologies impacting public policy in the states. CSG does not endorse the technologies shared as part of this experience.

WHEREAS, the availability of a highly skilled workforce is necessary to support growth and innovation in industries such as manufacturing, health care, telecommunications, biotechnology, information technology, energy, and transportation and logistics; and

WHEREAS, the nation’s industries face challenges to attract new and more diverse talent pools, replace a long serving and experienced workforce, and close gaps in workers’ skills and credentials; and

WHEREAS, equity in education refers to fairness in programs, strategies, and opportunities for all students; and

WHEREAS, equity is achieved when all students receive the resources they need to graduate prepared for success after high school; and

CSG Midwest
As of February 2017, nine states, including two in the Midwest, had some kind of automatic admissions policy in place, according to the Education Commission of the States. These policies guarantee that an in-state student will be admitted to a public university if he or she meets certain academic criteria.
South Dakota joined that list of states this fall, when the state Department of Education announced a new “proactive admissions initiative.” To be eligible, high school students must meet one of two benchmarks: 1) perform at a certain level on the state-administered assessment of math and English skills, or 2) have an ACT composite score of 18 or higher.
CSG Midwest
At the peak of North Dakota’s oil boom, some schools in the western part of the state not only were employing teachers, but began housing them as well — in duplexes, triplexes or mobile housing units, Sen. David Rust recalls. This school-as-landlord idea has been one of the more dramatic actions taken in recent years to address the shortage of teachers.
More recently, housing costs have subsided in North Dakota’s oil country (“They’re still higher than we would like to see,” Rust says), but the lack of qualified teacher candidates persists there, as well as in many communities across the state.

The Council of State Governments will host its 2017 National Conference from December 14th-16th in Las Vegas, Nevada. The meeting will offer engaging policy sessions geared toward state officials in all three branches of government. To access copies of speaker presentations, please visit the individual session pages below.

This 90-minute session will be a helpful tool for state leaders to learn about state ESSA plans and the innovative education practices and policies each state proposed. Speakers from the U.S. Department of Education and the Education Commission of the States will lead a discussion on the shared challenges and possible policy solutions that are addressed through ESSA. This session will also cover the projected top five issues in education and workforce for 2018.

CSG Midwest
Up to 15 communities in Michigan now have the chance to become “Promise Zones,” areas of the state where local students are ensured access to college scholarships. SB 98, signed into law in November, increased the reach of a program that has been in place since 2008. Prior to the new law, the number of communities was limited to 10.
CSG Midwest
A work group established earlier this year by the Iowa Legislature has issued a series of recommendations for strengthening computer science education in the state’s K-12 schools. Ideas include:
  • allowing students to use computer science to meet certain math credit requirements (after they’ve taken courses that cover the state’s required math standards);
  • better integrating computer science courses into schools’ career and technical education pathway; and
  • eventually making computer science a part of the state’s high school graduation requirement.

Pages