Policy Area

CSG South

As the 2020 legislative cycle approaches, legislators across the South are preparing and pre-filing legislation to address emerging and relevant policy issues in their states. With its regional focus, the Southern Legislative Conference (SLC) is uniquely positioned to identify and research current and emerging policy issues and trends. This report was prepared by Anne Roberts Brody, policy and program manager, and Roger Moore and...

In an amicus brief in Uzuegbunam v. Preczewski the State and Local Legal Center (SLLC) argues that when a government entity changes a policy after a lawsuit has been filed and the plaintiff only asks for nominal damages the case is moot.

Two Georgia Gwinnett College students sued the college over its Freedom of Expression policy,...

In United States v. Cooley the Supreme Court will decide whether tribal police have the authority to temporarily detain and search a non-Indian on a public right-of-way within a reservation based on a potential violation of state or federal law.

The Ninth Circuit held the tribal officer has no such authority unless a legal violation is “obvious” or “apparent.” If it isn’t, any evidence obtained in the search must not be used against...

The issue the Supreme Court will decide in Caniglia v. Strom is whether the Fourth Amendment “community caretaking” exception to the warrant requirement extends to the home.

A police officer determined Edward Caniglia was “imminently dangerous to himself and others” after the previous evening he had thrown a gun on the dining room table and said something to his wife like “shoot me now and get it over with.” Officers convinced Caniglia to go...

The Supreme Court has required governments to pay “just compensation” to property owners where the government “requires an owner to suffer a permanent physical invasion of her property—however minor.” But what if the invasion is temporary? In Cedar Point Nursery v. Hassid, the Supreme Court will decide whether a taking has occurred.

The U.S. Constitution’s Fifth Amendment allows the government to “take” private property as long...

Apprenticeships are on the rise. Employers are increasingly turning to apprenticeships to build strong pipelines of talent, and states are investing in apprenticeships as important workforce development tools. ...

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By Christina Gordley & Dexter Horne

 

National Apprenticeship Week (NAW) is November 8-14, 2020! The week is a nationwide celebration sponsored by the U.S. Department of Labor to unite business leaders, job seekers, educational institutions and other vital partners to show their support for apprenticeships....

Today the Supreme Court heard oral argument in California v. Texas. In this case it is possible the Supreme Court could rule that a portion of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) is unconstitutional and strike down the entire law.

Predicting the outcome of Supreme Court cases based on oral argument is a risky proposition. Nevertheless, it appeared at...

Governments and school districts across the country are determining how to effectively adapt to COVID-19 and mitigate its effects on student learning and well-being. In particular, they are determining how to design and implement distance learning that meets the needs of all students, including traditionally underserved students who are facing even greater obstacles to learning amid COVID-19. This includes working to provide students with the resources they need to engage in remote learning; supporting teachers in their remote...

In a very brief, unauthored opinion the Supreme Court denied qualified immunity in Taylor v. Riojas to a number of correctional officers who confined Trent Taylor to a “pair of shockingly unsanitary cells” for six days. The Court didn’t hear oral argument in this case, and Justice Barrett didn’t participate in it.

In the last decade the Supreme Court has repeatedly overturned lower court refusals to grant police officers qualified immunity....

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