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In 2002, the NCSBN Delegate Assembly approved the adoption of model language for a licensure compact for APRNs that would facilitate interstate practice for all four APRN roles: nurse practitioners, nurse midwives, clinical nurse specialists, and nurse anesthetists. Under the APRN Compact, only states that adopted the RN and LPN/VN NLC would be eligible to implement the compact for APRNs. Utah was the first state to pass APRN Compact legislation in 2004 (Senate Bill 107) with Iowa following shortly thereafter that same year (House File 784). Texas passed the law in June 2007 (House Bill 2426). Implementation of the APRN Compact was halted due to issues surrounding lack of uniformity of APRN titles and practice from state to state. In response, NCSBN, along with other nursing organizations, developed and began implementing the APRN Consensus Model, which addressed these problems.

Naloxone is a very effective and safe substance to reduce the effects of opioid drug overdose and prevent deaths. Overdose deaths more than doubled between 1999 and 2010. In 2010, deaths from both prescription drug and illicit drug overdoses surpassed traffic accidents as the number one cause of death for persons less than 65 years old. States essentially use two policy options to increase access to naloxone. A small minority of states allow naloxone sales by a pharmacy without a prescription. A majority of states allow pharmacists to dispense naloxone under a standing order from a licensed medical professional.

All states have statutes which allow individuals to delegate substitute decision-making authority. In Idaho, the main examples are financial powers of attorney and medical powers of attorney and mental health powers of attorney. If the person executes the document in Idaho and stays in Idaho, the documents will be recognized. However, in our mobile society, individuals move, travel, and may end up needing the document to be recognized in another jurisdiction. This Act is creating that ability.

This Act enacts the Interstate Medical Licensure Compact. The compact: Becomes effective when adopted by seven states; Creates an interstate commission comprised of two representatives from each member state to oversee operation of the compact; Provides for physicians licensed in one compact state to obtain an expedited license in another compact state; Directs the commission to maintain a database of licensed physicians, and disciplinary records involving licensed physicians, from compact states; Provides for joint investigations and disciplinary actions; Authorizes the commission to levy and collect an assessment on member states to cover the cost of commission operations, and provides civil immunity for commission representatives and employees; Reserves member states’ rights to determine eligibility for physician licensure, license fees, grounds for discipline and continuing education requirements.

Telehealth is one of the fastest growing sectors within the health care industry. Nurses are increasingly being asked to deliver care through electronic means, offering opportunities for better patient care regardless of geographic boundaries. The NLC is a state-based licensure model that facilitates innovative care models by allowing nurses to legally deliver that care to patients through a multistate license. The NLC also has economic benefits, as it facilitates and expedites the hiring process for employers in their state, by enabling them to verify licenses online and to recruit from other states without having to go through the entire endorsement process. The NLC reduces licensure fees for nurses who practice in more than one state, eliminates unnecessary duplicative license procedures, reduces a nurse’s ability to move to another state to avoid a disciplinary action, and provides more expedient access to nurses in times of national crises. In the face of calls for the federal government to address health care licensing nationally, the NLC also offers a state-based solution to the claims that licensure is a barrier to interstate practice.

The Act ends the practice of civil forfeiture but preserves criminal forfeiture, in which property is subject to forfeit if the owner is convicted of a crime. It requires proceeds to go to the state’s general fund, not to individual law enforcement agencies. The Act amends and revises forfeiture procedures when the State seeks to administer pecuniary punishment on a person convicted of a crime in instances where the State can also prove that property was used in or acquired from criminal activity.

This Act states that if a driver's blood contains five nanograms or more of delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) per milliliter in whole blood (5 ng/mL) at the time of the offense or within a reasonable time thereafter, this fact gives rise to a permissible inference that the defendant was under the influence of one or more drugs. THC is the primary psychoactive component of marijuana. DUI and DWAI are misdemeanors. Vehicular homicide is a class 3 felony if the driver was under the influence of alcohol, drugs, or both. Vehicular assault is a class 4 felony if the driver was under the influence of alcohol, drugs, or both.

The Uniform Collateral Consequences of Conviction Act addresses the penalties and disqualifications that individuals face incidental to criminal sentencing. The Act's provisions are largely procedural, and are designed to rationalize and clarify widely accepted policies and practices.

The UAPRHT is a comprehensive law directed against human trafficking. It provides the three components necessary for ending human trafficking: comprehensive criminal penalties; protections for human-trafficking victims; and public awareness and prevention methods.

This Act provides disclosure requirements to be included in agreements for the sale or lease of a distributed energy generating system.

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