WHEREAS, the United States and Canada have one of the largest trading relationships in the world, and Canada is the United States’ largest export market, valued at $322 billion in goods and services; and

WHEREAS, in 2016, trade between the United States and Canada totaled over $1.7 billion in goods and services every day, supporting 9 million jobs in the U.S., and Canada is the leading export destination for 32 U.S. states; and

WHEREAS, the Farm Bill supports our nation’s farmers, ranchers, forest owners, food security, natural resource and wildlife habitats, rural communities and the 16 million Americans whose jobs directly depend on the agriculture industry; and

WHEREAS, the Farm Bill addresses America’s critical farm, nutrition, and conservation needs and requires strong bipartisan support; and

WHEREAS, the state and local tax deduction has been a feature of the federal tax code for over 100 years, dating back to 1913; and

WHEREAS, eliminating the state and local tax deduction would increase taxes for approximately 24 percent of taxpayers nationwide; and

WHEREAS, it is in states’ best interests to stabilize health insurance markets, increase consumer choices, reduce health insurance premiums and stem health care cost growth; and

WHEREAS, regulation of health insurance markets has been a traditional area of state responsibility; and

WHEREAS, federal funding for the CHIP program has not been appropriated for 2018 or beyond; and

WHEREAS, states adopted budgets for 2018 during their 2016 or 2017 legislative sessions assuming that federal funds for CHIP would be appropriated; and

States spend billions each year on tax and financial incentives and in some states, tax expenditures can exceed revenues. The costs can also be unpredictable. The costs of some state tax incentive programs have increased quickly and unexpectedly by tens or hundreds of millions of dollars. With every public dollar being scrutinized, it is important to ask—are these incentives getting the scrutiny they deserve?

More than half of states have now legalized marijuana use—recreational or medicinal. That’s a massive shift in policy from just a decade ago. With this shift comes a slew of legislative, regulatory and fiscal questions for state policymakers to tackle. This day-long policy forum will provide an overview of the current legal landscape and best practices for taxation, regulation and licensing. The forum will discuss emerging trends and provide attendees direct exposure to Nevada’s marijuana legalization experience.

The Council of State Governments will host its 2017 National Conference from December 14th-16th in Las Vegas, Nevada. The meeting will offer engaging policy sessions geared toward state officials in all three branches of government. To access copies of speaker presentations, please visit the individual session pages below.

More than a quarter of U.S. workers now require a license to do their jobs, with most of these workers licensed by the states. States across the country are striving to engage more people in the workforce and at the same time protect the public interest. This session will cover innovative and successful models of state licensure for professions, as state leaders balance consumer protections, flexibility and accessibility for workers.

In states across the country, few topics are as hot with state policymakers as grid modernization. From California and New York to Ohio and Nevada, states and utilities are investigating how best to upgrade the electric power grid to enhance its efficiency and integrate more clean energy technologies. At the same time, large scale investment in grid modernization triggers key questions: Is it worth it? How can states maximize the potential benefits of grid modernization? As utilities come to the table for grid modernization funds, state policymakers have an opportunity to plan now to get ahead of the process and generate the most benefits from those investments. This session will explore strategies for wisely designing a grid modernization program that can guide utility investment and increase the chances that customers get the most out of grid modernization efforts.

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