The opinion upholds the constitutionality of the redistricting commission as a method to draw congressional and legislative redistricting lines after a Census.     

In 5-4 decision in Arizona State Legislature v. Arizona Independent Redistricting Commission the Court held that the Constitution’s Elections Clause permits voters to vest congressional redistricting authority entirely in an independent commission.   

In 2000 Arizona voters adopted Proposition 106 which places all federal redistricting authority in an independent commission. The Elections Clause states:  "[t]he Times, Places and Manner of holding Elections for Senators and Representatives, shall be prescribed in each State by the Legislature thereof; but the Congress may at any time by Law make or alter such Regulations . . . .”

Recently Rep. David Cicilline proposed the Automatic Voter Registration Act (H.R. 2694) in an effort to protect the right to vote and expand access for eligible voters in the United States. The bill requires local motor vehicle departments to forward information to elections officials, who send the individual a notification that they will be registered to vote after 21 days. Anyone can opt out of registration before the 21-day window is up but otherwise...

If you’re thinking about posting a picture of yourself and your recently cast ballot in an upcoming election you may want to think again. 44 states currently have laws in place preventing public display of a cast ballot. A U.S. District Court in New Hampshire is in the news of late considering the principle of their recently updated law on “ballot selfies”. The law was updated last year to include the following phrase, “taking a digital image or photograph of his or...

Title 42 of the United States Code §1973(a) states that, “No voting qualification or prerequisite to voting or standard, practice, or procedure shall be imposed or applied by any State or political subdivision in a manner which results in a denial or abridgment of the right of any citizen of the United States to vote on account of race or color”.  But what happens to groups of Americans who may experience inordinate and disproportionate burdens in pursuit of the right to vote?

The U.S. Constitution Equal Protection Clause’s “one-person one-vote” principle requires that voting districts have roughly the same population so that votes in each district count equally. But what population is relevant—total population or total voting population—and who gets to decide? The Supreme Court will decide these issues in Evenwel v. Abbott.

According to CSG’s Book of the States, three states will hold gubernatorial elections in 2015, followed by twelve states in 2016, two states in 2017, and 36 states in 2018. Here's a look at the upcoming gubernatorial elections, with a breakdown of the party seats that are up for grabs.

With record low voting turnouts, adequate proposals to ease voter registration are being discussed by various states. Such regulatory changes are expected to increase voter turnout and have acquired much support from the American public thus far. This month, Oregon became the first state to use data from their Department of Motor Vehicles for the purpose of automatically registering voters.  

In Alabama Legislative Black Caucus v. Alabama the Supreme Court held 5-4 that when determining whether unconstitutional racial gerrymandering occurred—if race was a “predominant motivating factor” in creating districts—one-person-one-vote should be a background factor, not a factor balanced against the use of race.  And Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act (VRA) does not require a covered jurisdiction to maintain a particular percent of minority voters in minority-majority districts.  The Court sent this case back to the lower court to reconsider in light of its opinion.

Redistricting policy in the United States has become highly partisan, with some state legislatures at odds over where and how to draw district lines and the legality of independent redistricting commissions being considered by the Supreme Court. This eCademy session features national experts on elections and redistricting policy to help state policymakers better understand the contemporary redistricting policy landscape, as well as innovative policy solutions.

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