According to the U.S. Census Bureau, voters between the ages of 18-24 have consistently voted at lower rates than all other age groups since 1964. Consequently, states are enacting statutes allowing for persons under the legal voting age of 18 to pre-register to vote.

The Federal Voting Assistance Program (FVAP) calls Americans who were born internationally and who have never resided in the U.S. “never resided” voters. The Uniformed and Overseas Citizen Absentee Voting Act grants eligibility for citizens that live outside of the U.S. to vote for federal offices. However, the jurisdiction in which the voter can cast a ballot relies on their last place of residency in the states. This leaves room for confusion when discussing citizens that have never resided in the United States and therefore do not have a “previous residency.”

CSG Midwest
Many states offer citizens a direct opportunity to create laws or constitutional amendments via the ballot box. Those that do also allow legislators to amend or even overturn those initiatives, a process generally known as “legislative intervention.”
CSG Midwest
Six states in the Midwest have “direct democracy”-type provisions that allow voters to veto bills passed by their legislatures or to adopt statutory or constitutional changes via the ballot.

In response to Green Party presidential candidate Jill Stein’s request for a statewide recount of the 2016 election, Michigan Secretary of State Ruth Johnson ordered the Michigan Bureau of Elections to audit all Michigan election results. A total of 4, 800 precincts were open across the state on Election Day, but 322 polling precincts could not be recounted due to the order of a federal judge to stop the completion of the recount because Jill Stein was not an aggrieved candidate. Of the 136 precincts in Detroit that were a part of...

On Jan. 18, the Virginia Senate introduced an amendment to Senate Bill 1490 to the Committee on Privileges and Elections calling for a pilot program that would allow the use of Common Access Card, or CAC, digital signatures on election materials. The proposed pilot program was adapted from a recent report from CSG’s Overseas Initiative, Recommendations from The CSG Overseas Voting Initiative Technology Working Group, released in early December 2016.

A majority of election voting systems deployed in states and local jurisdiction in states and local jurisdictions in the United States are at least 10 years old and coming to an end of their effectiveness, according to the Brennan Center for Justice. Many state governments purchased new machines under the Help America Vote Act, or HAVA, signed into law by President George W. Bush in 2002 after...

 

Free and fair elections serve as the cornerstone of a democratic system of governance. Providing an efficient and accurate voting system, and securing such a system against the threat of fraud and manipulation, is a challenge as old as our nation itself, one which states successfully have met. But these times, in which there are unsupported allegations of voter fraud and the potential of election systems being hacked by enemies foreign and domestic, bring both new needs and new opportunities for federal, state and local elections officials. As technologies advance to offer opportunities to strengthen state and local election officials’ capacities to carry out elections, opportunities also emerge to jeopardize our voting systems.
As an experienced convener of the nation’s most seasoned elections officials, The Council of State Governments stands ready to assist in addressing the complex issues facing the American elections system.
CSG Midwest
For 40 years, Mary Murphy has been introducing legislation and casting votes that shape public policy in her home state of Minnesota. But the longtime state representative always had her eye on being part of another vote, and this past year, she finally got the chance. In December, Rep. Murphy and nine other fellow Minnesotans met in St. Paul to make the state’s official votes in the U.S. Electoral College. A packed room of people — some of them high school teachers and students who had participated in a statewide mock election run by the secretary of state — watched the proceedings in the Senate Office Building.
“It was everything I expected, and more,” Murphy said a few days after casting her votes for Hillary Clinton and Tim Kaine.
The event had special meaning for Murphy because of her many years as a high school history and civics teacher. But for most people, in most presidential elections, the Electoral College is little more than an afterthought. This time was different. First, for one of the few instances in the nation’s history, the winner of the nation’s popular vote (Clinton) lost the race for president. Second, between the Nov. 8 general election and the Dec. 19 Electoral College vote, some electors in states where Donald Trump won the popular vote were pressured to cast a vote for someone else.
CSG Midwest
In November 2016, a panel of federal district judges struck down Wisconsin’s 2011 state legislative district maps as an unconstitutional gerrymander. “It is clear that the drafters got what they intended to get,” Judge Kenneth Ripple wrote in the 2-1 decision. “There is no question that Act 43 was designed to make it more difficult for Democrats, compared with Republicans, to translate their votes into seats.”

Pages