According to CSG’s Book of the States, three states will hold gubernatorial elections in 2015, followed by twelve states in 2016, two states in 2017, and 36 states in 2018. Here's a look at the upcoming gubernatorial elections, with a breakdown of the party seats that are up for grabs.

With record low voting turnouts, adequate proposals to ease voter registration are being discussed by various states. Such regulatory changes are expected to increase voter turnout and have acquired much support from the American public thus far. This month, Oregon became the first state to use data from their Department of Motor Vehicles for the purpose of automatically registering voters.  

In Alabama Legislative Black Caucus v. Alabama the Supreme Court held 5-4 that when determining whether unconstitutional racial gerrymandering occurred—if race was a “predominant motivating factor” in creating districts—one-person-one-vote should be a background factor, not a factor balanced against the use of race.  And Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act (VRA) does not require a covered jurisdiction to maintain a particular percent of minority voters in minority-majority districts.  The Court sent this case back to the lower court to reconsider in light of its opinion.

Redistricting policy in the United States has become highly partisan, with some state legislatures at odds over where and how to draw district lines and the legality of independent redistricting commissions being considered by the Supreme Court. This eCademy session features national experts on elections and redistricting policy to help state policymakers better understand the contemporary redistricting policy landscape, as well as innovative policy solutions.

Voting in off years is important for overseas military personnel. With the 2014 midterm elections over, military personnel residing overseas might think voting is over until the general election in 2016. Not true. Odd numbered years also hold important elections. 2015 will see elections for school boards, mayors, judges, and other important offices and issues. These elections have a direct impact on citizens. Overseas military personnel help defend the right to vote, and they should exercise the right for themselves.

The Florida Legislature is considering a bill to aid overseas voting by expanding the Federal Write-in Absentee Ballot to State and local elections.

More than a dozen state legislatures appear poised to consider gas tax increases this year, but Michigan will take a path less traveled when voters go to the polls May 5 to consider a complicated ballot measure that would provide an extra $1.2 billion a year for state roads.

With the 2016 elections on the horizon, states will be looking at new policies to improve the security, efficiency and administration of elections. U.S. elections by their very nature are decentralized and often complex with each state determining its own election laws and voting equipment. Five elections policy areas loom large for state policymakers in 2015—voting technology, overseas voting, data sharing between the states, voting law challenges and campaign finance.

Republicans scored major victories in the 2014 elections across the country. Here is a look at the states' elective offices and key initiatives following the sweeping election.

The new advertising campaign for the Federal Voting Assistance Program makes clear its mission for military and civilian voters living overseas: “Americans make small votes every day and we want to make sure that you get your most important vote home.” The program, a part of the U.S. Department of Defense, is using that campaign—in addition to an active social media presence and other efforts—to spread the word about the resources it is providing for citizens living overseas, according to Scott Wiedmann, the Federal Voting Assistance Program’s director of communications.

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