On June 22, 2016, President Barack Obama signed into law the Frank R. Lautenberg Chemical Safety for the 21st Century Act, or H.R. 2576, which provides for a major overhaul of the 1976 Toxic Substances Control Act, or TSCA. While TSCA was enacted to regulate chemicals, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency had only mandated testing on approximately 200 of the tens of thousands of chemicals used in commerce since TSCA’s inception. In addition, the EPA had restricted the uses of only five chemicals in existence before the passage of the TSCA in 1976.

In recent years, many jurisdictions have modernized and eased longstanding alcohol restrictions. In June, both Colorado and Pennsylvania enacted laws that were described as the biggest changes to the industry since Prohibition was repealed.

Frustration and disappointment are often part of the ticket-buying process for people who want to see their favorite megastars live in concert. Single ladies might have a better chance at getting into one of the upcoming Beyoncé concerts than couples and groups, and Adele fans might have more than lost love to cry about when they’re left empty-handed without a ticket to one of her shows this fall. Blame it, at least partly, on bots, software that allows scalpers to quickly snag large quantities of tickets online.

This Act permits certain individuals to report the occurrence or suspected occurrence of financial exploitation of qualified adults, defined as a person who is either 60 years of age or older or has a disability as defined under current law and is between the ages of 18 and 59. The Act permits certain individuals to notify an immediate family member, legal guardian, conservator, co-trustee, successor trustee, or agent under power of attorney of the qualified adult if they are of the belief that the qualified adult is, or may become, a victim of financial exploitation. The Act permits certain individuals to refuse to make a disbursement from the account of a qualified adult or an account on which a qualified adult is a beneficiary or beneficial owner if the individual reasonably believes the request will result in financial exploitation

The Act clarifies that Internet gambling cafes, also known as Internet sweepstakes cafes, are illegal gambling activity. Café proprietors typically advertise for sale internet time or long-distance telephone minutes. In addition to the internet time or telephone minutes, the purchaser will receive entries in an internet sweepstakes and can participate in the sweepstakes games on the café’s computers set up for that purpose. Based on a random allocation of winning and losing entries, the customer may or may not win cash prizes through the games.

The Uniform Real Property Transfer on Death Act (URPTODA) enables an owner to pass real property to a beneficiary at the owner’s death simply, directly, and without probate by executing and recording a TOD deed. Just as importantly, URPTODA permits the owner to retain all ownership rights in the property while living, including the right to sell the property, revoke the deed, or name a different beneficiary.

They are known as ride-sharing or ride-hailing companies and in some circles as transportation network companies or TNCs. Uber, Lyft and other similar companies provide an update on the traditional taxi service, complete with a smartphone interface that has made them popular among the tech-savvy, millennial generation. State governments have found themselves playing catch-up in recent years, trying to authorize and regulate an upstart industry their laws never envisioned. But as policymakers navigate the particulars of basic operational questions like how to protect riders from unsafe or unsavory drivers, these services present a myriad of other policy questions for both the short and long terms.

CSG Midwest

As the U.S. Congress considers legislation to better protect consumers from the threats posed by data breaches and identity theft, the nation’s state attorneys general have delivered a unified message: Don’t pre-empt state laws. Forty-four attorneys general (including 10 from the Midwest) signed the July letter to lawmakers. “Additional protections afforded consumers by a federal law must not diminish the important role states already play,” they wrote.

This Act provides disclosure requirements to be included in agreements for the sale or lease of a distributed energy generating system.

The Uniform Voidable Transactions Act (UVTA), formerly named the Uniform Fraudulent Transfer Act (UFTA), strengthens creditor protections by providing remedies for certain transactions by a debtor that are unfair to the debtor’s creditors. The 2014 amendments to the UVTA address a small number of narrowly-defined issues, and are not a comprehensive revision of the act. The Uniform Fraudulent Transfer Act was promulgated in 1984 and has been enacted by 43 states, the District of Columbia, and the U.S. Virgin Islands as of 2014. The act replaced the very similar Uniform Fraudulent Conveyance Act, which was promulgated in 1918 and remains in force in two states as of 2014.

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