Imagine this scenario:  husband buys life insurance and designates his wife as the beneficiary. A few years later the state adopts a revocation-upon-divorce statute applicable to life insurance beneficiaries which states that upon divorce the designation of a spouse as a life insurance beneficiary is revoked. A few years after that the couple divorces but the husband never changes his life insurance beneficiary. A few years after that the husband dies.

Is the ex-wife still the beneficiary?

In ...

In this Ohio v. American Express Ohio has asked the Supreme Court to offer guidance on its “rule of reason” test under antitrust law. The “quick-look” version of this test requires the government to show anticompetitive harms and the defendant to show procompetitive benefits. The party proving greater harms or benefits wins. This case is relevant to states because 11, including Ohio, have sued American Express claiming one of its contract provisions with merchants accepting American Express credit cards violates the Sherman Act (antitrust law).  

American Express charges merchants who accept its credit card higher fees than its competitors. American Express’s standard contract non-discriminatory provision (NDP) requires merchants to not say or imply that they prefer any payment method over American Express.   

CSG Midwest
Every Midwestern state requires drivers to have auto liability insurance. The rate that individuals pay for this insurance is based on a host of factors — some connected to their driving habits and history, others unrelated. For example, some states may have higher-than-average litigation or medical care costs; their residents pay higher premiums as a result, the Insurance Information Institute notes.
Within a state, too, premiums can vary considerably from one driver to the next. That is because, in setting rates, auto insurers use a mix of “driving factors” and “non-driving factors.” The former includes an individual’s driving record, the type of car being insured and the number of miles driven; the latter includes age, gender, marital status, credit history and where the driver lives.

The recent hack of the consumer reporting agency Equifax compromised the security of 143 million Americans’ personal information, including Social Security numbers, birth dates, addresses, and driver’s license numbers. The incident serves as a stark reminder of the perils of identity theft and its impact on consumer credit reports. As a response to these concerns, certain credit monitoring and control provisions have been granted to consumers through federal and state. 

On June 22, 2016, President Barack Obama signed into law the Frank R. Lautenberg Chemical Safety for the 21st Century Act, or H.R. 2576, which provides for a major overhaul of the 1976 Toxic Substances Control Act, or TSCA. While TSCA was enacted to regulate chemicals, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency had only mandated testing on approximately 200 of the tens of thousands of chemicals used in commerce since TSCA’s inception. In addition, the EPA had restricted the uses of only five chemicals in existence before the passage of the TSCA in 1976.

In recent years, many jurisdictions have modernized and eased longstanding alcohol restrictions. In June, both Colorado and Pennsylvania enacted laws that were described as the biggest changes to the industry since Prohibition was repealed.

Frustration and disappointment are often part of the ticket-buying process for people who want to see their favorite megastars live in concert. Single ladies might have a better chance at getting into one of the upcoming Beyoncé concerts than couples and groups, and Adele fans might have more than lost love to cry about when they’re left empty-handed without a ticket to one of her shows this fall. Blame it, at least partly, on bots, software that allows scalpers to quickly snag large quantities of tickets online.

This Act permits certain individuals to report the occurrence or suspected occurrence of financial exploitation of qualified adults, defined as a person who is either 60 years of age or older or has a disability as defined under current law and is between the ages of 18 and 59. The Act permits certain individuals to notify an immediate family member, legal guardian, conservator, co-trustee, successor trustee, or agent under power of attorney of the qualified adult if they are of the belief that the qualified adult is, or may become, a victim of financial exploitation. The Act permits certain individuals to refuse to make a disbursement from the account of a qualified adult or an account on which a qualified adult is a beneficiary or beneficial owner if the individual reasonably believes the request will result in financial exploitation

The Act clarifies that Internet gambling cafes, also known as Internet sweepstakes cafes, are illegal gambling activity. Café proprietors typically advertise for sale internet time or long-distance telephone minutes. In addition to the internet time or telephone minutes, the purchaser will receive entries in an internet sweepstakes and can participate in the sweepstakes games on the café’s computers set up for that purpose. Based on a random allocation of winning and losing entries, the customer may or may not win cash prizes through the games.

The Uniform Real Property Transfer on Death Act (URPTODA) enables an owner to pass real property to a beneficiary at the owner’s death simply, directly, and without probate by executing and recording a TOD deed. Just as importantly, URPTODA permits the owner to retain all ownership rights in the property while living, including the right to sell the property, revoke the deed, or name a different beneficiary.

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