The Urban Institute released an analysis of the state-by-state impact of the AHCA, 2019 to 2028. The Urban Institute looked at the impact of the proposal on state funding (see Table 5). If states made up for the loss of federal funds with state funds, it would require a 16.1 percent increase in all states' Medicaid spending over the ten year period. 

Yesterday the Congressional Budget Office – or CBO – released its cost estimate for the House Republican plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. All told, the report says, the federal deficit would be reduced by $337 billion over the 2017-2026 decade. Reducing the federal deficit is welcome news to most federal policymakers.

On Monday, March 6, the House Republicans released the American Health Care Act, the measure intended to fulfill their campaign pledges to repeal and replace the Obama administration Affordable Care Act. Here is the summary provided by the House Republicans. 

Of primary interest to state policymakers, the House plan implements a per capita cap in Medicaid funding, beginning in 2020, based on FFY 2016 spending levels. The House Republican plan has not been scored by the Congressional Budget Office so there are no publicly available data on how much this change will cost states and save the federal government.

Kaiser Health News has created a special website to keep track of news about changes to the Affordable Care Act. KHN says it will provide analysis, explanation, investigation and data on its site called Repeal & Replace Watch. You can bookmark this on your browser.

A new study out of Michigan concludes that the state’s Medicaid expansion is to the state’s financial advantage.

When the legislature approved the expansion in 2013, it required that Michigan achieve other health care savings and revenue to offset the state match required starting Jan. 1, 2017 – or the state would reverse its expansion.

The Medicaid Policy Academy provided attendees an opportunity to meet with federal government officials and other Medicaid experts to develop a deeper understanding of program rules and requirements. With the upcoming change of administration in Washington, D.C., speakers and attendees discussed how policy changes might impact states' Medicaid programs. 

Presentation slides and audios from the session are posted, as well as speaker biographies. 

CSG Midwest
Starting in January, states that chose to expand their Medicaid programs under the Affordable Care Act will have to begin paying part of the associated costs, and three of the Midwest’s expansion states say they will rely at least in part on revenue from their taxes on health care providers.

Seema Verma, a health policy consultant from Indiana, has been picked by President-elect Donald J. Trump to direct the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services according to Politico.

Health policies and programs in the states face an uncertain future with the election of Donald J. Trump. During his campaign he vowed to repeal the Affordable Care Act.

Currently 73 million Americans are enrolled in the Medicaid program, a federal-state partnership program for which the federal government pays 62 percent of total expenditures. A Medicaid block grant, one proposal under discussion, might provide the states more flexibility but also might transfer more financial responsibility, especially in the long term, to the states. 

Today's Stateline article by Christine Vestal highlights three states--California, Maryland and New York--that are moving to use Medicaid reimbursement policies to facilitate more counseling for substance use addicts who are in medication-assisted treatment. 

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