On Tuesday, Jan. 12, John Bel Edwards signed his first executive order as Louisiana’s new governor to expand Medicaid eligibility to an estimated 300,000 individuals. The expansion is to be effective no later than July 1, 2016 according to the order.

Louisiana becomes the 31st state (plus DC) to expand Medicaid income eligibility as permitted by the Affordable Care Act.

South Dakota Gov. Dennis Daugaard may find that the third time is the charm as he negotiates with the federal government to live up to its treaty obligations to provide health services to the state’s Native Americans. Twice before in recent state history, governors have tried and failed to solve the longstanding problem, which results in a massive cost shift to state revenues to pay for health care for many Native Americans. In his Dec. 8, 2015, budget address in Pierre, S.D., Daugaard proposed that should the federal government fulfill its obligation to provide health services to Native Americans, the state would use the projected $67 million annual savings to the state to finance the cost of Medicaid expansion.

CSG Director of Health Policy Debra Miller outlines the top five issues in health policy for 2016, including Medicaid expansion, substance abuse and drug overdoses, cost containment, the graying of America, and population health. 

#1  Medicaid Expansion

Thirty states and the District of Columbia have expanded Medicaid eligibility to 138 percent of the federal poverty level as allowed by the Affordable Care Act, and they will be required to contribute matching funds beginning Jan. 1, 2017. This means that legislatures in those states will have to appropriate state funds during their budget sessions in 2016.  

The federal funding will decrease from covering 100 percent of the newly eligible...

CSG Director of Fiscal and Economic Development Policy Jennifer Burnett outlines the top five issues for 2016, including strategic decisions following modest revenue growth, workforce development, public pensions, federal instability, and health care costs. 

No state can ignore the challenge of controlling the cost of health care, estimated to reach one-fifth of GDP by 2020. Medicaid budget growth continues to strain states’ abilities to grow program priorities in other arenas. The uncertainty of federal commitment to current Medicaid matching formulas is exacerbated by the 2016 election. Promising state strategies to control costs of health care generally and Medicaid specifically were explored.

CSG Midwest
South Dakota leaders are taking steps this fall to become the Midwest’s eighth state to expand Medicaid access under the Affordable Care Act. According to the Sioux Falls Argus Leader, the planned expansion would add 48,500 residents to the public health insurance program.

The Kaiser Family Foundation released a report Oct. 13 with state by state estimates of the uninsured. Nationally, 32.3 million non-elderly persons are uninsured, but one half of that number is missing out on Medicaid or CHIP eligibility in...

On Sept. 21, news that Turing Pharmaceuticals raised the price of a 62-year-old drug by 4,000 percent overnight made headlines. The drug, Daraprim, is critical to the care of HIV and AIDS patients. The sharp rise in price from $18 to $750 per pill is part of the all-too-familiar trend of drug-price spiking in the United States and highlights concerns about the sustainability of health care.

Arizona is asking the federal government to allow it to add work requirements and lifetime eligibility limits for some adults enrolled in Medicaid, Stateline reported today. The request, which is in the form of a Section 1115 waiver request, is required under laws passed by the 2015 Arizona State Legislature. Senate Bill 1475 and Senate Bill 1092 require the governor to submit the waiver but do not link continuation of the current Medicaid expansion to the waiver’s approval. Former Gov. Jan Brewer vetoed nearly identical legislation the year before, the Arizona Daily Star reported in March 2015.

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