The Kaiser Family Foundation released a report today with state by state estimates of the uninsured. Nationally, 32.3 million non-elderly persons are uninsured, but one half of that number is missing out on Medicaid or CHIP eligibility in their...

On Sept. 21, news that Turing Pharmaceuticals raised the price of a 62-year-old drug by 4,000 percent overnight made headlines. The drug, Daraprim, is critical to the care of HIV and AIDS patients. The sharp rise in price from $18 to $750 per pill is part of the all-too-familiar trend of drug-price spiking in the United States and highlights concerns about the sustainability of health care.

Arizona is asking the federal government to allow it to add work requirements and lifetime eligibility limits for some adults enrolled in Medicaid, Stateline reported today. The request, which is in the form of a Section 1115 waiver request, is required under laws passed by the 2015 Arizona State Legislature. Senate Bill 1475 and Senate Bill 1092 require the governor to submit the waiver but do not link continuation of the current Medicaid expansion to the waiver’s approval. Former Gov. Jan Brewer vetoed nearly identical legislation the year before, the Arizona Daily Star reported in March 2015.

Twenty-two state legislators and one governor's health policy advisor from states gathered in Washington, D.C. on Sept. 21-23, 2015, for a CSG-led Medicaid Leadership Policy Academy. Almost 50 percent of the attendees were chairs or vice-chairs of health committees in their home states. A significant number...

Two sources of contemporaneous data available from reputable national research institutions provide evidence that the Affordable Care Act has realized its principal goal of increasing the rate of health insurance coverage in the United States. The rates of uninsured Americans between late 2013 and early 2015 have dropped from 18 percent to 11.9 percent, according to Gallup, and from 17.4 to 10.1 percent, according to the Urban Institute. Further, the Gallup data which also provide state-by-state statistics show that the states with the greatest uptake in health insurance were more likely to have increased Medicaid eligibility and to operate state-based health insurance exchanges

On Tuesday, the Legislative Council, which handles budget and business when the full legislature is not in session, voted 10-1 to file a lawsuit against Gov. Bill Walker over his unilateral executive action to expand Medicaid eligibility, according to the Alaska Dispatch News.

Gov. Walker, after unsuccessfully trying to get the legislature to approve his budget proposal to expand Medicaid eligibility during the 2015 session, followed the lead of governors in Kentucky and West Virginia and took action without the legislature’s approval.

The new Medicaid rules are to go into effect on September 1 and would made Alaska the 30th state to expand Medicaid as allowed under the Affordable Care Act.

Long-term care for the elderly and disabled is driving up Medicaid costs, and states should take notice. That was the message of speakers at the 2015 CSG Medicaid Policy Academy held June 17-19 in Washington, D.C. “In nine states, at least 30 percent of Medicaid enrollees are elderly or disabled,” explained Matt McKillop, an officer for the State Health Care Spending division of The Pew Charitable Trusts. The main source of funding to provide long-term care and support for these individuals streams from Medicaid through state budgets. McKillop highlighted national data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services that showed the elderly and disabled individuals comprised 24 percent of Medicaid enrollees in 2010, but accounted for 64 percent of total Medicaid expenditures in the states.

State legislators attending the fourth annual CSG Medicaid Policy Academy June 17-19, in Washington, D.C., learned how critical Medicaid funding can be to services for vulnerable persons. Dr. Jeffery Brenner, a 2013 winner of a MacArthur Foundation genius award, challenged the group to rationalize the health care system. He described how his project in Camden, N.J. has reduced costs and improved care for patients suffering from a complex set of chronic diseases. Health care workers visit patients in their residences and seek to evaluate not just medical needs but social and emotional needs as well. 

Dr. Jeffrey Brenner—executive director of the Camden Coalition of Healthcare Providers, a 2013 MacArthur Fellow and family physician—thinks we don’t need to ration health care. “We need to rationalize care,” Brenner said at a recent CSG eCademy session, “Delivering Better Health Care for Less.” The webcast was broadcast live as part of CSG’s 2015 Medicaid Policy Academy in Washington, D.C.

Long-term care and supports were the focus of the 2015 CSG Medicaid Policy Academy, held in Washington, D.C., June 17-19, 2015. The 30 registered CSG members came from 19 states. Home states are marked in purple in the map below. Over the four years CSG has convened the Medicaid Policy Academy, legislators from 42 states have participated. 

The program concluded with a plenary session featuring Dr. Jeffrey Brenner, medical director of the Urban Health Institute at the Cooper University Healthcare as well as the founder and executive director of Camden (N.J.)  Coalition of Healthcare Providers. In 2013, Dr. Brenner was named a MacArthur Fellow for his work on addressing the health care needs of the chronically ill in impoverished neighborhoods.