A measles outbreak in Minnesota has reached 69 cases total and is costing public health departments thousands of dollars as they try to track, treat and control the spread of this disease. Among the 69 confirmed cases, 65 have been confirmed in people who are unvaccinated. In addition, 66 of the cases occurred in children under 18 as reported by the Minnesota Department of Health.

CSG Midwest
Nebraska Gov. Pete Ricketts in April signed LB 195, also known as “Cheri’s Law,” requiring that women be notified of breast tissue density following mammograms. It had passed the states’ Unicameral Legislature by a vote of 48-0.
The law requires that written notice be given to women if a mammogram reveals heterogeneous or extremely dense breast tissue. Such tissue can make breast cancer more difficult to detect. Under the new law, mammography patients must be told that a finding of dense breast tissue is normal, and that notice is being given to raise awareness and so patients can further discuss risk factors and detection methods with their doctor.
CSG Midwest
Take a look at the longer-term trends in maternal mortality rates, and you see one of the great success stories in modern-day public health: In 1900, for every 1,000 live births, up to nine women were dying of pregnancy-related complications; a century later, that rate had declined by almost 99 percent.
But the story told by more recent data is less clear, and more troubling.
According to the U.S. Centers of Disease Control and Prevention, the number of reported pregnancy-related deaths increased between 1987 and 2013 — from 7.2 deaths per 100,000 live births to 17.3 in 2013. Better reporting (for example, the addition of a pregnancy check box on state death certificates) is one explanation for the increase. Another reason, though, may be that pregnancy-related deaths are actually on the rise. The CDC notes, for example, that more pregnant women have conditions such as hypertension, diabetes and chronic heart disease that may put them at a higher risk of complications. 
CSG Midwest
On March 10, Ohio became the first Midwestern state (and the second overall, behind New Jersey) to begin providing a safe place for newborns to sleep by offering “baby boxes” to all new parents.
CSG Midwest
State policymakers are increasingly realizing that beyond the importance of early childhood development lies its foundation, a healthy birth outcome for parents and their newborns.
CSG Midwest
Mammograms are perhaps the best-known tool to detect breast cancer, but their effectiveness can be diminished if the breast tissue itself is dense enough to hide the tumors.
CSG Midwest
In an effort to save young lives at risk due to drug overdoses, the state of Michigan is giving its schools the chance to stock naloxone, an “opioid antagonist” drug. SB 805 and 806, signed into law in December, set several parameters for school districts.
CSG Midwest
Midwestern states were healthier, overall, than the country as a whole in 2016, according to the United Health Foundation’s newest “America’s Health Rankings Annual Report,” released in December 2016 (based on data as of October). The report found that:
CSG Midwest
When the problem of tainted drinking water created a public health crisis in the Michigan city of Flint, the state’s legislators had two clear missions to fulfill. First, fix the problem, with strategies — both immediate and longer-term — that help affected residents, bring back some normalcy to their lives, and then assist in the entire community’s recovery. Second, find ways to prevent the problem from ever occurring in another Michigan city.
And that idea of prevention has spread well beyond the borders of Michigan, with legislators in nearby states taking notice of the crisis and beginning to think more about the safety of the water supply in their own districts.

One in five health care dollars is spent caring for people with diabetes and prediabetes. Eighty-six million Americans have prediabetes, but most don’t know it. If we can prevent just 30 percent of individuals with pre-diabetes from developing diabetes, we can save $74 billion dollars in medical costs and lost productivity. CSG is engage in surveying states to look at how they are tackling diabetes and how they are allocating resources to the effort.

Presentation slides and audios from the session are posted, as well as speaker biographies. 

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