CSG Midwest
Mammograms are perhaps the best-known tool to detect breast cancer, but their effectiveness can be diminished if the breast tissue itself is dense enough to hide the tumors.
CSG Midwest
In an effort to save young lives at risk due to drug overdoses, the state of Michigan is giving its schools the chance to stock naloxone, an “opioid antagonist” drug. SB 805 and 806, signed into law in December, set several parameters for school districts.
CSG Midwest
Midwestern states were healthier, overall, than the country as a whole in 2016, according to the United Health Foundation’s newest “America’s Health Rankings Annual Report,” released in December 2016 (based on data as of October). The report found that:
CSG Midwest
When the problem of tainted drinking water created a public health crisis in the Michigan city of Flint, the state’s legislators had two clear missions to fulfill. First, fix the problem, with strategies — both immediate and longer-term — that help affected residents, bring back some normalcy to their lives, and then assist in the entire community’s recovery. Second, find ways to prevent the problem from ever occurring in another Michigan city.
And that idea of prevention has spread well beyond the borders of Michigan, with legislators in nearby states taking notice of the crisis and beginning to think more about the safety of the water supply in their own districts.

One in five health care dollars is spent caring for people with diabetes and prediabetes. Eighty-six million Americans have prediabetes, but most don’t know it. If we can prevent just 30 percent of individuals with pre-diabetes from developing diabetes, we can save $74 billion dollars in medical costs and lost productivity. CSG is engage in surveying states to look at how they are tackling diabetes and how they are allocating resources to the effort.

Presentation slides and audios from the session are posted, as well as speaker biographies. 

The first case of local transmission of the Zika virus outside of Florida has been reported in Brownsville, Texas.

Concerns related to the Zika virus are growing as the virus spreads to new areas of the globe and as the virus is linked to an increasing number of health problems. Could a genetically engineered mosquito help fight the virus? Some Florida voters will have a chance to weigh in on November 8th.

Some states are implementing policies to increase the use of long-acting reversible contraception, known as LARCs, among Medicaid enrollees. LARCs--intrauterine devices, or IUDs, and subdermal contraceptive implants--are highly effective forms of birth control, with pregnancy rates of less than 1 percent within the first year. A five-year Colorado pilot program documented a 48 percent reduction in the state's teen birth and abortion rates.

CSG Midwest
Before the night she suffered a severe allergic reaction that took her life nine days later, 13-year-old Annie LeGere had grown up with only minor allergy symptoms. There was no reason for her, her family or her health providers to believe she should have a prescription to an epinephrine autoinjector, the emergency treatment that can save lives in cases of anaphylaxis (a serious allergic reaction, most commonly to food).
But what if the first people often to respond to a medical emergency (including in Annie’s case) — local police officers — could carry these autoinjectors and be trained on how to administer them? The minutes saved by administering the drug on-site rather than in an emergency room could be the difference between life and death.
In Illinois, these officers now will have the opportunity, thanks to a bill passed this year (HB 4462) known as Annie’s Law. One of the leading proponents of HB 4462, Illinois Sen. Chris Nybo, worked closely on the measure with Annie’s family, which has created a foundation in her name with the goal of preventing future tragedies.

Acting on the growing scare over Zika, Delaware and Texas will allow Medicaid coverage for insect repellent as a Zika infection prevention strategy. Such policies are in line with a June 1 guidance from federal Medicaid officials.  

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