An article in today's Kaiser Health News suggests that a President Trump could dismantle much of the Affordable Care Act without Congressional action. For instance, just a stroke of his presidential pen could eliminate subsidies to persons between 100 and 250 percent of the poverty level. On the other hand, Clinton's proposals to support and build on the ACA would seem to require Congressional action. 

Voters in Colorado will head to the polls this November not only to cast their ballots for the next president of the United States, but also to determine whether they will become the only state in the nation to adopt single-payer health care.

More than 20 legislators from 16 states--many of them in key leadership positions on health or budget committees that deal with Medicaid in their home states--attended a CSG policy academy in Washington D.C. on September 21-23, 2016, to learn how states are making reforms in their Medicaid program that pursue the health "triple aim": improving the quality of care for individuals, improving the health of populations, and reducing per capita costs of health care.

States are increasingly turning to community paramedicine to help fill the gap in the health care workforce. States have been experimenting with community paramedicine programs for the last five years or more. Expanding the role of licensed or certified emergency medical technicians—or EMTs—and paramedics to provide non-emergency preventive health care services directly to patients in their communities can be cost-effective and make up for health care work force shortages. 

Voters in Colorado will face a choice on the ballot this November regarding medical aid in dying for the terminally ill. The “Colorado End of Life Options Act,” or Initiative 145, is a proposal that would allow physicians to prescribe life-ending medications to adult Colorado residents who have a terminal illness with a prognosis of six months to live or less.

On August 16, the insurance giant Aetna announced that it will be withdrawing from insurance exchanges in 11 states beginning in 2017.  This move comes on the heels of the decision by Humana and United Healthcare to substantially reduce the number of states in which they offer coverage.

Maybe, but not as soon as Gov. Bentley had hoped.

On Tuesday, Aug. 23, the Alabama House failed to allow a committee meeting to move forward in time to get the lottery proposal, as a constitutional amendment, on the Nov. 8 general election ballot, according to media coverage by

On July 5, 2016, Hawaii became the third state to require all public and private health insurance providers to cover 12 months’ worth of contraceptives at one time. Other states introduced similar legislation in 2016. Research has shown that this change could have enormous effects.

Kaiser Family Foundation has posted an excellent web panel discussion on drug pricing. Representatives from Pfizer, a large international pharmaceutical company; Express Scripts, and Aetna, a major health insurance carrier, talk with Larry Levitt, a Kaiser senior vice president.

A comparison of U.S. Census data for 2013 and 2014, released in early 2016, shows that a greater portion of Americans in each state had health insurance in the more recent year. Nearly 8.5 million individuals gained health insurance coverage between 2013 and 2014. In 2014, all the provisions of the Affordable Care Act designed to increase access to affordable insurance were in place for states. Some states, however, decided not to expand income eligibility for Medicaid to 138 percent of the federal poverty level as the Supreme Court ruled in 2012 was the prerogative of the states, not Congress. The states that showed the greatest increase in coverage between 2013 and 2014 were states that expanded Medicaid income eligibility.