The story of the population and economic decline of some of the Midwest’s largest, historically most important cities did not begin in 2000 and will likely not end in 2010.  Nonetheless, data from U.S. Census 2010 are striking in showing the extent of the out-migration from many of this region’s central towns.

Kansas lawmakers are hoping the creation of Rural Opportunity Zones will help address a long-time concern in many parts of the state: the loss of population.

As legislators go about the work of redrawing political maps, one fundamental rule guiding their decisions will be to keep the populations of political districts as equal as possible.

In a decade when the U.S. population grew at the smallest rate since the 1930s and the Great Depression, every Midwestern state failed to keep pace with the nation’s 10-year growth rate of 9.7 percent.

State eNews Issue #42 | March 17, 2010
 

Households across the country started receiving special 2010 census questionnaires in the mail this week, and David Adkins wants everyone to take just 10 minutes to fill out the letter’s 10 questions.

That’s because as executive director of The Council of State Governments, Adkins knows the more people who fill out and return the forms, the more likely the states will get their fair share of...

NOW, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, The Council of State Governments supports the goals and ideals for the 2010 Census and will disseminate 2010 Census information to encourage participation.

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, The Council of State Governments asks its affiliates and membership to partner together to achieve an accurate and complete count.

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, The Council of State Governments encourages its members to participate in events and initiatives that will raise overall awareness of the 2010 Census and increase participation among all populations.
 

Census 2000 data reveal a new set of patterns, featuring a new cast of demographic actors. States and regions have begun to steal the show from cities, suburbs and countryside. In this article, states are grouped into three broad categories according to their distinct demographic trajectories: the Melting Pot states, the New Sunbelt states and the Heartland states.