Those in attendance at the "Growing Green: Marijuana Policy Impacts on State Budgets"  session at the CSG National Conference heard that states have collected what they characterized as significant but not game changing revenues. Friednash and Todd, both from Colorado, the first state to legalize sales of recreational marijuana, reinforced that marijuana revenues are but a sliver of overall state revenues. In his presentation, economist Beau Whitney presented estimates of other economic impacts of marijuana legalization...

The Council of State Governments hosted its 2018 National Conference from Dec. 5th - Dec. 8th in Northern Kentucky/Greater Cincinnati.

The meeting provided state leaders with a full agenda structured to tackle some of the most pressing issues facing state governments. If you would like to review the agendas and speakers, or get copies of the presentations and related materials, please

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On November 28-30, the states a part of the occupational licensing policy learning consortium convened for the second annual meeting in Clearwater, Florida. The state teams had the opportunity to focus on four population groups who are disproportionately affected by licensure—individuals with criminal records, veterans and military spouses, dislocated workers and immigrants with work authorization. License portability, reciprocity, and interstate compacts were also major topics. States had the opportunity to connect with and learn from fellow consortium states, as well as hear from states outside of the consortium that have taken action on occupational licensure including Nebraska and Michigan. 

On Dec. 7, state leaders will have the opportunity to discuss the benefits of early childcare, and why states should invest in making early childhood education affordable for working families, at a CSG 2018 National Conference session titled Working Families and the Struggle to Find Early Care and Education.
Albert Wat, senior policy director at the Alliance for Early Success, provided CSG with valuable insight on this critical issue. According to Wat, the cost of and the lack of access to quality childcare and education are the biggest struggles families face. Wat called the search for childcare an equity issue among low-income families.

During the 2018 CSG National Conference in Northern Kentucky - Greater Cincinnati, attendees will have the opportunity to participate in a day-long policy academy on Wednesday, Dec. 5, 8 a.m.- 5 p.m. to consider state options to implement gaming in their states following the recent Murphy decision by the U.S. Supreme Court. 

In March 2018 Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross issued a memorandum stating a citizenship question would be added to the 2020 census questionnaire. In In Re Department of Commerce the Supreme Court will not be deciding whether this question may be legally added. Instead, the Court will decide—among other things—whether Secretary Ross may be deposed as to his motives for adding this question.

A number of state and local governments and nonprofits sued the Secretary claiming that adding this question is arbitrary and capricious in violation of the Administrative Procedure Act.

In the 2018 memorandum Secretary Ross stated that he “began a thorough assessment” of whether to add a citizenship question “[f]ollowing receipt” of a December 2017 letter from the Department of Justice (DOJ) requesting citizenship data to enforce the Voting Rights Act’s prohibition against diluting the voting power of minority groups.

The number of transactions conducted with credit and debit cards has grown steadily in the United States over the last decade. Electronic transactions conducted with credit cards and debit cards increased from 27 billion in 2001 to 105 billion in 2016, an annual increase of about 19 percent.

This trend has caused U.S. governments to encourage their agencies to use electronic payment methods even as the agencies continue to accommodate cash and check payments. During the CSG 2018 National Conference in Northern Kentucky – Greater Cincinnati Dec. 6-8, CSG will release a report titled Cash-less State Governments: Electronic Collections & Benefit Disbursements.

CSG Midwest
In North Dakota, two features of the state’s economy have persisted for years now: some of the lowest jobless rates in the nation, and workforce shortages challenging individual employers and entire economic sectors. 
“By most estimates, we have over 20,000 unfilled jobs,” notes North Dakota Sen. Brad Bekkedahl.
Would scholarships or a loan-forgiveness program — with some strings attached — help fix this mismatch between worker supply and demand? And which of these two options would work best? Those questions were explored during the legislative interim and will likely emerge again when lawmakers convene in early 2019.

During the 2018 National Conference, CSG will release the Stay-at-Work/Return-to-Work (SAT/RTW) Toolkit. The U.S. Department of Labor and the Office of Disability Employment Policy’s State Exchange on Employment and Disability collaborated on the toolkit. It was designed to provide states with policy options, best practices and implementation strategies to aid efforts in increasing employment retention and labor force participation of employees who acquire, or are at risk of developing, work disabilities.

The repeal of net neutrality rules under the Obama administration has now been in effect for four months. During this time, states have re-enacted the rules at the state level, urged the federal government to reinstate the rules, and appealed the decision to a D.C. federal court. Net neutrality is the principle that internet service providers—including Verizon, AT&T, Spectrum, and others—should enable access to all content and applications regardless of the source, and without favoring or blocking particular products or websites.

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