Yesterday, in response to concerns about insurers pulling out of the ACA marketplaces and raising premiums, the federal government published proposed rules to stabilize the individual and small group health insurance markets.

In a press release, Dr. Patrick Conway, Acting Administrator of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services acknowledged the changes are short term relief “while future reforms are being debated.” 

All but three state legislatures will meet in 2017 to adopt budgets. Medicaid, the federal-state health insurance program that currently covers about 73 million Americans, is the single-largest component of state budgets. It is all but certain that big changes are ahead for Medicaid under the Trump administration, but the shape, fiscal impact and speed of those changes are likely to remain unclear before sine die adjournment in many states.

Early Friday, Feb. 10, Dr. Tom Price was confirmed by the Senate in a 52 to 47 vote as the new secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services. The Representative from Georgia, an orthopedic surgeon by trade, moved into politics when he first ran for the Georgia State Senate in 1996 and then moved on to Congress in 2004.

“The role of the Department in improving lives means it must carry out its responsibilities with compassion. It also must be efficient, effective, and accountable, as well as willing to partner with...

2016 CSG National Conference
Friday, Dec. 9, 2016

Sponsored by the CSG Health Public Policy Committee

Health spending in the United States is big business, consuming 17 percent of the gross domestic product. This session explored trends in health business including consolidation of hospitals, insurance and physician practices. Business tools such as pay for performance and value-based purchasing are used to reduce costs and increase positive outcomes. Consumer direction and price transparency...

CSG Midwest
In an effort to save young lives at risk due to drug overdoses, the state of Michigan is giving its schools the chance to stock naloxone, an “opioid antagonist” drug. SB 805 and 806, signed into law in December, set several parameters for school districts.
CSG Midwest
Midwestern states were healthier, overall, than the country as a whole in 2016, according to the United Health Foundation’s newest “America’s Health Rankings Annual Report,” released in December 2016 (based on data as of October). The report found that:
CSG South

Among the many concerns currently facing America's healthcare system, few are more significant, both medically and fiscally, than long-term care (LTC). Broadly defined as a range of services that support individuals who are limited in their ability to care for themselves, long-term care stands to become one of America's foremost healthcare challenges in the years ahead. With the continuing rise of U.S citizens 65 and over — statistically, the demographic most in need of LTC — states need to begin preparing for the growing pressures that will be placed on their budgets by the nation's aging population. This SLC Special Series Report explores the challenges long-term care poses for states in the SLC region. Subsequent reports will examine possibilities for managing long-term care and highlight actions that states in the SLC region have taken to tackle this important issue.

Kaiser Health News has created a special website to keep track of news about changes to the Affordable Care Act. KHN says it will provide analysis, explanation, investigation and data on its site called Repeal & Replace Watch. You can bookmark this on your browser.

A new study from the Commonwealth Fund finds that repeal of two major federal spending provisions of the Affordable Care Act, insurance premium tax credits and the expansion of Medicaid, would ultimately lead to the loss of 2.6 million jobs in 2019. The data, generated by researchers at George Washington, breaks down the impact of repeal for each state. California would lose the most jobs, 334,000 their multistate economic forecasting model suggests, and Wyoming the least with 4,000 jobs lost.

A new study out of Michigan concludes that the state’s Medicaid expansion is to the state’s financial advantage.

When the legislature approved the expansion in 2013, it required that Michigan achieve other health care savings and revenue to offset the state match required starting Jan. 1, 2017 – or the state would reverse its expansion.

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