Austin, Ind., a city of about 4,200 people in Scott County, Ind., off Interstate 65, has been the epicenter of an HIV outbreak, said Maureen Hayden, statehouse bureau chief for CNHI Indiana Newspapers. HIV has spread among intravenous drug users and more than 170 cases have now been reported. Hayden, a reporter who continues to cover the outbreak in southeast Indiana, was one of three presenters who discussed Indiana’s situation and substance abuse treatment options during a recent CSG eCademy webcast, “Harm Reduction: Needle-Borne Disease and Substance Abuse.”

CSG Midwest
As Indiana Rep. Charlie Brown sees it, a new plan to enroll eligible inmates in Medicaid has the chance to be a win-win for his state and its taxpayers: Reduce recidivism by giving more people the health services they need, and cut long-term costs in the criminal justice system.
Signed into law earlier this year, HB 1269 (of which Brown was a co-sponsor) received overwhelming legislative approval, and it is part of a broader trend that has states looking for new ways to improve outcomes for state and local inmates, who have disproportionately high rates of mental illness and substance abuse.

Earlier this year, an unexpected outbreak of HIV in southern Indiana triggered a high-profile emergency response while demonstrating the dangerous link between substance abuse and certain infectious diseases. This FREE eCademy webcast explores lessons from Indiana's experience, policy options and the latest research on effective treatment of substance abuse.

On Tuesday, the Legislative Council, which handles budget and business when the full legislature is not in session, voted 10-1 to file a lawsuit against Gov. Bill Walker over his unilateral executive action to expand Medicaid eligibility, according to the Alaska Dispatch News.

Gov. Walker, after unsuccessfully trying to get the legislature to approve his budget proposal to expand Medicaid eligibility during the 2015 session, followed the lead of governors in Kentucky and West Virginia and took action without the legislature’s approval.

The new Medicaid rules are to go into effect on September 1 and would made Alaska the 30th state to expand Medicaid as allowed under the Affordable Care Act.

The White House heroin response strategy announced today, with a price tag of $13.4 million, will emphasize treatment as well as public safety. According to Reuters, Michael Botticelli, Director of National Drug Control Policy, said the new plan will address the heroin and painkiller epidemics as both "a public health and a public safety issue."

CSG’s webcast, “Needle-Borne Disease and Substance Abuse,” Tuesday, Aug. 18 at 2 p.m. EDT, will provide timely context and background on the issues the White House program strives to address. The surge of prescription opioid abuse in southern Indiana precipitated an HIV epidemic in that state earlier this year.

Earlier this year, Indiana experienced an outbreak of HIV in one small rural community that was traced back to needle-sharing among individuals using and abusing prescription drugs. Public health experts warn that other communities could encounter outbreaks of HIV and hepatitis C given the rampant abuse of prescription drugs and heroin. 

CSG's FREE eCademy webcast at 2 p.m. on Aug. 18  will explore lessons from Indiana's experience, policy options that states might pursue and the latest research on effective treatment of substance abuse.

Earlier this year, GlaxoSmithKline, a member of CSG’s Leadership Circle, announced its collaboration with the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill to create a center dedicated to finding a cure for HIV and AIDS. The HIV Cure center will be located on the university’s campus and is expected to attract top talent from around the world.

Kentucky is taking the lead, using an innovative approach, to provide its 9,000 state employees and their dependents with readily accessible primary care options. The state has established health clinics that provide primary care and treatment for allergies, acute infections, strep throat, rashes, cold and flu, and routine wellness and prevention. Since its inception in 2010, state employees have experienced reduced time away from work, increased work productivity and reduced out-of-pocket health care costs.

Long-term care for the elderly and disabled is driving up Medicaid costs, and states should take notice. That was the message of speakers at the 2015 CSG Medicaid Policy Academy held June 17-19 in Washington, D.C. “In nine states, at least 30 percent of Medicaid enrollees are elderly or disabled,” explained Matt McKillop, an officer for the State Health Care Spending division of The Pew Charitable Trusts. The main source of funding to provide long-term care and support for these individuals streams from Medicaid through state budgets. McKillop highlighted national data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services that showed the elderly and disabled individuals comprised 24 percent of Medicaid enrollees in 2010, but accounted for 64 percent of total Medicaid expenditures in the states.

This week Gov. Jerry Brown signed into law SB 277 which removes the personal belief exemption parents could use to exempt their children from vaccination requirements tied to public school attendance.  When the law becomes effective in 2016, California will become the third state, after Mississippi and West Virginia, to allow vaccination exemption for medical reasons only.  

Pages