I learned a few things last week when I was visiting with Indiana Rep. Ed Clere, one of the new co-chairs of CSG’s Health Public Policy Committee.

  • That week, the state announced the 100,000th person enrolled in the Medicaid expansion waiver, called HIP 2.0 in Indiana, after the program opened less than a month before. Indiana had three Medicaid managed care organizations already engaged in the state and the state Medicaid office and the
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States that previously were reluctant to expand Medicaid eligibility as allowed under the Affordable Care Act are considering waivers for expansion designed with their state politics and health care system in mind. Several governors met with President Obama in January to advocate for their proposals. This eCademy session addresses how much flexibility states have under Section 1115 waivers and provides an overview of state waiver proposals.

 

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For Justice Kennedy it was his questions, for Chief Justice Roberts it was his silence…

Today the Supreme Court heard oral argument in King v. Burwell, where it will decide whether federal health insurance exchanges, operating in 34 states, can offer subsidies to middle and low income purchasers of insurance under the Affordable Care Act (ACA). 

Simply put, the Court must decide whether it agrees with the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) that the following statutory language, “established by the State,” can include federal exchanges too.

March 4 is an important date for anyone who cares about health policy. The Supreme Court justices will hear oral arguments in the case King v. Burwell, challenging tax subsidies for health insurance purchase in states that are not running their own health insurance exchanges.

The potential impact of the case is clear. Approximately 7.5 million Americans in 34 states receive subsidies to offset the cost of health insurance purchased through the federally-run exchange.

Family vacation time in Disneyland has started a nationwide conversation about vaccinations against measles and other preventable diseases.

According to new CDC data on immunization rates of kindergartners in the 2013-2014 school year, 94.7 percent of children had received the MMR vaccine. This national level is below the recommended rate of 95 percent, which provides "herd immunity" extending protection to those who might not be able to receive the immunization due to medical conditions. 

Over 90,000 children were...

Who would have believed that a holiday trip to California’s Disneyland could lead to the sudden spread of measles, a disease formerly believed to have been nearly eradicated? The new outbreak of measles—reported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to have infected 121 people in 17 states and the District of Columbia between Jan. 1 and Feb. 6, 2015 —has brought the topic of vaccinations into the public eye and become one of the top political discussions of the day.

On Friday, Feb. 6, the Wyoming Senate voted 19 to 11 to reject a bill to expand Medicaid, WyoFile.com reported.

Majority Floor Leader Sen. Eli Bebout said, according to Wyo.File reporting, “Now is not the time. I think being cautious, and doing it the Wyoming way is the way we do things.”

States face a conundrum as they struggle to regulate and tax e-cigarettes and other vapor systems that deliver nicotine to their users. Definitions in current tobacco and smoking laws can be amended to apply; however the evidence-base to establish equivalency to tobacco has not yet been established. Only three states have totally prohibited the use of e-cigarettes in public places, but 41 states prohibit the purchase of e-cigarettes to minors. Just two states have established taxes on these new products.

The Senate Health Committee defeated Gov. Bill Haslam’s proposal to expand Medicaid in a 7-4 vote yesterday, according to the Times Free Press. Later in the day, both the House and Senate voted to adjourn the special session that had been called to consider the measure.

The poverty guidelines for 2015 are available and published here in the Federal Register. These guidelines -- often cited as 100 percent of the federal poverty line -- are used to determine eligibility for a number of stata and federal programs. Sometimes eligibility is greater than 100 percent; for instance, the Affordable Care Act allows states to expand Medicaid eligibility to 138 percent of federal poverty. 

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