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Autonomous vehicles, peer-to-peer and fleet car sharing, the use of telematics data to measure the habits of drivers. All are innovative and disruptive technologies in the automobile world that could have significant implications for insurance in the years ahead. In this webinar, a panel of experts discussed the public policy considerations stemming from these advancements.

CSG Midwest
In 2016, drivers distracted by their phones or other devices caused 1,230 crashes on Iowa roads, nearly double the number from a decade ago, state statistics show. This year, the state’s lawmakers passed two bills to crack down on these motorists.
CSG Midwest
Indiana has become the latest state in the Midwest to raise the gas tax and user-based fees to generate more revenue for its transportation infrastructure. The 10-cent increase on motor fuels takes effect on July 1; it will result in Hoosier motorists paying a total of 28 cents per gallon of gasoline. In subsequent years, through 2024, Indiana’s gas tax will be indexed to inflation, though annual increases will be limited to 1 cent per gallon.

Unmanned aircraft systems—commonly known as drones—have changed the landscape of public and private life. The many uses for drones include law enforcement surveillance, wildlife tracking, disaster response and recreation. For this reason, state governments have considered a diverse spread of policies aimed at defining, regulating and, in some cases, prohibiting the use of unmanned aircraft systems, or UAS, since 20131. Bills defining drones and establishing rules for their use are highly variable at the state level.

Every four years, the American Society of Civil Engineers releases the Infrastructure Report Card, which details the condition and performance of 16 categories of infrastructure and assigns a letter grade to each. Each infrastructure category is evaluated on the basis of capacity, condition, funding, future need, operation and maintenance, public safety, resilience, and innovation. During this webinar, ASCE officials discussed what the 2017 report says and the resources available to policymakers who may want to explore their states’ infrastructure needs as they consider funding and policy options this year.

Congress approved legislation in 2012 known as Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century, or MAP-21, that not only provided two years of funding for transportation programs and a variety of policy changes after nearly three years of short-term extensions but also set in motion a process that continues today, even after minor tweaks were made in 2015’s five-year Fixing America’s Surface Transportation, or FAST, Act. States and planning organizations have been working with the Federal Highway Administration, or FHWA, to implement a performance-based approach to the federal highway program.

Last December, I compiled my annual list of the states to watch on transportation funding. Last month we followed that up with a CSG eCademy webinar featuring Alison Premo Black of the American Road & Transportation Builders Association and reporters from three key states. With legislative sessions well underway in many places, it’s time to see where things stand in the debates about transportation funding going on around the country.

The Council of State Governments has released its annual listing of the top five issues legislators will face this session in nine key policy areas, including education, workforce development, energy and the environment, federal affairs, fiscal and economic development, health, interstate compacts, transportation, and international affairs.

The election of Donald J. Trump in November left some state transportation advocates scratching their heads about the role states and localities will need to play in the years ahead to ensure that progress on transportation continues, that priorities are maintained and that future investments reflect those priorities.

CSG Director of Transportation and Infrastructure Policy Sean Slone outlines the top five issues in transportation policy for 2017, including federal infrastructure investment plans, state solutions for infrastructure funding, autonomous vehicles, transit-oriented community develpoment, project selection and prioritization.

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