CSG Director of Education Policy Pam Goins outlines the top five issues in education policy for 2015, including school readiness, experiential and work-based learning, academic success for at-risk populations, innovative state accountability systems, and advance attainment of degrees, certificates and other high-quality credentials. 

State officials and policymakers have been focused on college- and career-readiness for several years yet challenges still exist to graduate students with the skills and competencies necessary to obtain sustainable employment. 2015 promises to be another busy year concentrated on implementing best practices and enacting innovative policies that prepare America's youngest students for entry into school, create environments for all students including those at-risk, and offer a variety of experiences so students participate in work-based opportunities. In order to ensure a world-class education for all students, leaders will likely address these top 5 issues facing states this year.

On Thursday, Nov. 20 a group of state legislators and education officials met with staff from the White House Intergovernmental Affairs and representatives from the U.S. Departments of Education and Health and Human Services.  An update on the Administration's priorities, the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) and critical early education initiatives were discussed.

Ask Bruce Atchison, director of the Early Childhood Institute at the Education Commission of the States, if college- and career-readiness begins in preschool and he answers with a resounding yes.

Executive function and self-regulation—the ability to hold onto and work with information—are key components of workforce readiness, Atchison said.

To be successful in today’s world, every student must graduate from high school with the knowledge and skills needed for success in college, the workforce and life. Experts agree instruction to put students on track for college- and career-readiness can’t wait to begin until kindergarten. This session focused on policies and program solutions to ensure successful and expanded access to preschool education. 

To be successful in today’s world, every student must graduate from high school with the knowledge and skills needed for success in college, the workforce and life. Experts agree instruction to put students on track for college- and career-readiness can’t wait to begin until kindergarten. This session focused on policies and program solutions to ensure successful and expanded access to preschool education.

To be successful in today’s world, every student must graduate from high school with the knowledge and skills needed for success in college, the workforce and life. Experts agree instruction to put students on track for college- and career-readiness can’t wait to begin until kindergarten. This session focused on policies and program solutions to ensure successful and expanded access to preschool education.

To be successful in today’s world, every student must graduate from high school with the knowledge and skills needed for success in college, the workforce and life. Experts agree instruction to put students on track for college- and career-readiness can’t wait to begin until kindergarten. This session focused on policies and program solutions to ensure successful and expanded access to preschool education.

In order for the U.S. to maintain its global economic competitiveness, each student must graduate from high school with the knowledge and skills needed for success in college, the workforce and life. But many experts agree high-quality educational programs can’t wait to begin until kindergarten....

Vermont Governor Peter Shumlin signed a bill yesterday that will provide funding for universal prekindergarten in the state. In accordance with the law, three- and four-year-olds will have access to at least ten hours per week of publicly funded pre-k at either public or private schools, including schools outside of their district.

Pages