On Thursday, Nov. 20 a group of state legislators and education officials met with staff from the White House Intergovernmental Affairs and representatives from the U.S. Departments of Education and Health and Human Services.  An update on the Administration's priorities, the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) and critical early education initiatives were discussed.

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Over the past two years, a big change has occurred in high schools across the state of Kansas. More and more students are getting a head start on their future careers and their postsecondary studies — by enrolling in and completing courses in career and technical education, or CTE. The rates of growth in the state are striking.

Alabama Rep. Mac Buttram thinks it’s about time people start thinking about career and technical education in a different way. Buttram recently was appointed to Gov. Robert Bentley’s new Alabama Workforce Council. The council, comprised primarily of state business leaders, is designed to help K-12 and higher education institutions in the state better meet the needs of businesses and industries. He was one of the featured speakers at CSG’s Policy Academy on Workforce Development, held Aug. 9 at the CSG National and CSG West Annual Conference in Alaska.

With the push for increased academic performance of America's students most education stakeholders have focused on the aspect of being "college-ready."  However, the competencies necessary to be "career-ready" may vary and individual states are grappling with defining what attributes must be mastered for a student to succeed in the workforce. The Center on Education Policy (CEP) recently released a report which shows that only 14 of the 46 states that responded to their survey have a statewide definition of what it means for high school students to be career-ready.

Career technical education is a vital part of education improvement efforts and will play a vital role in enhancing the nation’s economy by providing skills preparation aligned to current and future labor market demands. Career technical education provides a robust opportunity for meeting the labor and education demands of the global economy.
 

On Monday, President Barack Obama officially unveiled his budget for 2013.  As he spoke from Northern Virginia Community College, Obama highlighted the more than $65 billion in education funding focused on resources dedicated to transforming K-12 and postsecondary education to ensure students have the skills and knowledge to succeed in the future.

How can states help create K-12 education systems that better prepare students for careers and college? This article looks at a potential policy framework, as well as some examples of approaches being taken in Indiana, Minnesota, Ohio and Wisconsin.

Approximately half the electric utility sector workforce will retire in the next 10 years.  This will leave a shortage of experienced workers in every organizational facet, from linemen to power engineers, potentially affecting energy reliability.