The importance of ensuring effective teacher preparation programs, or TPPs, continues to be an issue of significant interest to state policymakers. As the focus of teacher education increasingly shifts from training to preparing, several states are undertaking new approaches to identifying and promoting successful TPPs. Louisiana and Tennessee have developed statewide systems that track the academic growth of a teacher’s P-12 students back to the preparation program from which that teacher graduated. This webinar focused on strategies by Southern states to ensure teachers are well-prepared for the classroom.

Research institutions are a key ingredient to innovation and long-term economic growth, and the United States has a long history of being a global leader.

CSG Midwest
Ohio lawmakers approved legislation this fall that will require more accountability and transparency in charter schools, which now educate one of every 10 students in the Buckeye State. Between 2003 and 2013, federal data show, enrollment in these alternative public schools jumped from 3.4 percent to 10.0 percent in Ohio.
CSG South

Just three years ago, almost every state in the nation belonged to a national testing consortium, such as the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers (PARCC) and Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium (Smarter Balanced) whereas, today, barely half continue to participate in these multi-state comparative student assessments. The Southern region, in particular, has seen a shift away from the national testing consortia to state-specified student testing. As state education systems adapt to their new educational standards of college- and career-readiness, state governments continue to modify their approach to assessing student learning toward these standards.

After dismissing PARCC and Smarter Balanced, several states' education systems began, and currently continue, a transition to various alternatives. This SLC Regional Resource provides an overview of the strategies that SLC member states have undertaken for student testing, as of October 1, 2015. Specifically, the analysis examines the current status of K-12 testing requirements implemented by the 15 SLC member states for their general public school populations and the experiences of these states as they seek to improve their student performance measurement systems. Further, the report focuses on the many adjustments and changes to K-12 English language arts and mathematics student assessment systems implemented by Southern states in the post-Common Core educational era, geared toward preparing college- and career-ready students.

Aligning jobs with workers who possess the skills to succeed is a challenge that calls for solutions from K-12 and postsecondary systems and employers. Dec. 10 during the CSG 2015 National Conference in Nashville, Tenn. The policy academy will look at ways to create career pathways and develop innovative postsecondary programs to help students prepare for success in the high-demand jobs industry is filling today

Higher education R&D spending is funded by a variety of sources, the largest of which is the federal government, which funded 59 percent of spending in 2013, followed by funding from the institutions themselves, which equaled 22 percent. State and local government spending made up 5.5 percent of total R&D spending. During The Triple Helix session at the CSG 2015 National Conference in Nashville, Tenn., experts from government, academia and the private sector will discuss how best to collaborate in developing a long-term strategy to grow the economy.

Econ Piggy

Research institutions are a key ingredient to innovation and long-term economic growth, and the United States has a long history of being a global leader. According to the National Science Foundation, universities spent $67.2 billion on research and development across all fields in the 2013 fiscal year.

While the face of America may be changing rapidly, the face of the STEM workforce in America isn’t going anywhere fast.

While the definition of giftedness varies from state to state, federal legislation is quite clear about the definition of a gifted student. According to the No Child Left Behind Act, “gifted and talented” refers to students “who give evidence of high achievement capabilities in such areas as intellectual, creative, artistic, or leadership capacity, or in specific academic fields, and who need services or activities not ordinarily provided by the school in order to fully develop those capabilities.”

Experts say an education in science, technology, engineering, arts and math—or STEAM—is essential to building an innovative workforce in the United States, and the sooner students delve into STEAM education, the better.