CSG Midwest
When President Trump announced that he intended to levy a 25 percent tariff on imported steel, and a 10 percent tariff on imported aluminum, U.S. trade partners were surprised — and angry.  
His actions came after a U.S. Commerce Department report found that the unfair “dumping” of steel and aluminum (exporting these products to the United States at below domestic market value) by other countries was leading to plant closings and job losses. This has been deemed by the Trump administration a threat not only to domestic manufacturing, but also to national security.
At first stating that there would be no exceptions to the tariffs, Trump stepped back from that position by the time of his formal declaration. He exempted Canada (the largest exporter of steel and aluminum to the United States) and Mexico from the tariffs, at least temporarily.
For the many integrated industries in the Midwest that rely on cross-border trade, such as the auto sector, this exemption was particularly important. 
CSG Midwest
Negotiators from Canada, Mexico and the United States have begun their seventh round of discussions for a new, or modernized, North American Free Trade Agreement. And while the dissolution of NAFTA seemed very likely several months ago, negotiations are still alive.

Dear SIDO Colleagues,

Welcome to the 2018 SIDO Washington Forum! Thank you for making the trip to our nation’s capital and we’re looking forward to an exciting couple of days. On behalf of our SIDO leaders, we sincerely appreciate your participation in our Washington Forum and for your ongoing support. For those who are not yet members, we would encourage you to become a member. Please feel free to reach out to me or any of our board members if you are interested.

WHEREAS, international trade and foreign investment are major contributors to the United States economy and help support millions of good-paying jobs throughout state and local communities; and

WHEREAS, U.S. exports account for nearly 13 percent of the U.S. gross domestic product and support an estimated 11.5 million jobs; and

CSG Midwest
What’s at stake for the Midwest’s food and agriculture sectors when it comes to the future of the North American Free Trade Agreement? A whole lot of jobs and economic activity, according to a letter signed in November by nearly 170 agriculture organizations and companies and sent to all 50 U.S. governors.
“Withdrawal from the accord would have adverse impacts,” the letter states before detailing why, as well as the economic consequences in various sectors.
For instance, Canada and Mexico account for 40 percent of the volume of U.S. pork exports (seven of the 10 leading states for pork production are in the Midwest) and 27 percent of U.S. beef exports (five of the 10 states with the most cattle are in the Midwest).
CSG South

Since NAFTA’s implementation in 1994, trade between the SLC region and Canada and Mexico has changed dramatically. As officials from Canada, Mexico and the U.S. attempt to renegotiate the agreement’s stipulations, it is instructive for policymakers to understand the current position of their states’ exports and imports with these trading partners. A renegotiation could have significant ramifications across state economies, including in the agriculture, automotive, and manufacturing industries.

International trade was a frequent issue of debate during the 2016 presidential election and the results demonstrated a growing concern among voters around the impact of trade agreements and globalization. Many trade experts will point to Great Britain’s vote to leave the European Union in 2016 as the first indicator in the shift of global trade policy, and reevaluating the impact of international trade agreements. As federal leaders debate the direction of trade policy, states continue to expand exports and attract investments into their respective states; while continuing to improve the coordination with federal agencies to make the trade process easier for their businesses.

CSG Midwest
When the North American Free Trade Agreement took effect in 1994, it created the largest free trade area in the world at that time. By increasing trade and investment, reducing tariffs and addressing non-tariff barriers, the leaders of Canada, Mexico and the United States hoped to grow their countries’ economies and raise living standards across the continent.
“NAFTA worked, fundamentally shaping North American economic relations, driving integration between Canada and the United States’ developed economies and Mexico’s developing economy,” says Colin Robertson, vice president of the Canadian Global Affairs Institute and a former Canadian diplomat.
More trade with neighbors
In many measurable ways, NAFTA has been a major success. U.S. trade with its two neighbors has grown at a faster rate than its economic activity with the rest of the world. The value of U.S. exports to Mexico reached $231 billion last year, with Michigan ranking third among all U.S. states ($12 billion), and for the Midwest, the cross-border relationship with Canada is especially valuable. Canada serves as the largest export market for nine of the 11 states in this region (Kansas and Nebraska are the lone exceptions).
In states such as Michigan and Ohio, much of this cross-border trade centers on the automotive industry, where cars and their various parts are built via supply chains that send components across the border multiple times on their way to completion.
In fact, intermediate goods (not-yet-completed products) from Canada and Mexico accounted for half of all total imports from these countries. Free trade is essential to preserving these cross-border supply chains. According to the Canadian Embassy, trade with Canada supports close to 9 million jobs in the United States. The Mexico Institute estimates that nearly 5 million jobs in the U.S. depend on trade with Mexico.
But from the start, the three-nation agreement has failed to fully recognize how changes in North American trade would negatively affect certain workers and industries, says Christopher Wilson, deputy director of the Mexico Institute.

With the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) back in the news, the important trade relationship between Canada, Mexico and the states is in the spotlight. For 30 out of the 50 States, Canada or Mexico rank as the first or second largest export market. Here are some quick stats about state exports to these two trading partners and the jobs that rely on that trade relationship.

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