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Moving cattle and pigs from North Dakota to Saskatchewan or from Manitoba to Minnesota has always required a lot of paperwork, but until recently, that didn’t slow the movement of animals between Canada and the United States. Because of the two countries’ highly integrated systems, animals have regularly traveled across the U.S.-Canada border for feeding and slaughter.
But a U.S. policy enacted as part of some recent farm bills appears to be inhibiting this movement. Mandatory country-of-origin labeling, or COOL, requires meat from outside the United States to be labeled — and thus segregated during the production process. These rules began to take effect in 2009.

In a fiscal environment with much competition for limited state resources, state leaders need the ability to make data-driven policy decisions more than ever before. Increasingly, state leaders are using economic analysis software and data systems to predict economic impacts. Users have used one of those programs, IMPLAN, to estimate the direct, indirect, induced and total impacts of foreign direct investment to their state’s economy including the number of jobs supported, labor income, total value added and tax revenue.

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Concerned about the economic impact of a proposed fee increase on truck shipments moving across the U.S.-Canada border, the Midwest’s state and provincial legislators are urging the U.S. Department of Agriculture to reconsider the plan.
The Midwestern Legislative Conference adopted the resolution on the final day of its four-day Annual Meeting in Nebraska. It originated from the MLC’s Midwest-Canada Relations Committee, which met on the first day of the meeting.

NOW, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that The Council of State Governments urges the U.S. Congress to pass reauthorization of Ex-Im Bank before the current authorization extension expires September, 2014.

In today’s knowledge-based global economy, economic development is contingent on innovation that creates jobs and stimulates competition in the global marketplace. Safeguarding intellectual property rights behind this innovation incentivizes the innovators and creators, attracts world-class research and development, and creates and sustains high-quality jobs. This session featured leading trade experts who will discuss the hot topics in global innovation and intellectual property.

In today’s knowledge-based global economy, economic development is contingent on innovation that creates jobs and stimulates competition in the global marketplace. Safeguarding intellectual property rights behind this innovation incentivizes the innovators and creators, attracts world-class research and development, and creates and sustains high-quality jobs. This session featured leading trade experts who discussed hot topics in global innovation and intellectual property.  

In today’s knowledge-based global economy, economic development is contingent on innovation that creates jobs and stimulates competition in the global marketplace. Safeguarding intellectual property rights behind this innovation incentivizes the innovators and creators, attracts world-class research and development, and creates and sustains high-quality jobs. This session featured leading trade experts who discussed hot topics in global innovation and intellectual property.  

SLC's latest Issue Alert examines how, even though the relative importance of agriculture and agriculture-related industries in the overall U.S. economy has diminished in recent years, the sector continues to be a critical component of the nation's gross domestic product (GDP). In 2012, the latest year available, the U.S. Department of Agriculture reported that the sector contributed $775.8 billion toward GDP, a 4.8 percent share; the output of the nation's farms alone totaled $166.9 billion in 2012.

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WASHINGTON, D.C.—Enhancing competitiveness and promoting good governance are two of the many reasons trade still matters, according to Mary Ryckman, the assistant United States trade representative for Trade and Development.

Trade, she said, allows the U.S. and its trading partners to “define the rules of the road, the standards that countries should adhere to, the norms which create a sense of fairness among economies, and the mechanisms by which disagreements can be peacefully...

2014 SIDO WASHINGTON CONFERENCE

JUNE 18-20, 2014

LIAISON HOTEL

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