According to a study by the Rockefeller Institute of Government, the key to states’ success in economic development is no longer just the traditional packages of tax breaks, incentives and infrastructure, but the knowledge assets they possess in the form of their educational institutions.  Economists term this “the knowledge economy” and most successful businesses will be those that depend on research, new ideas, technology and upgraded skills of their work force.

On May 21, at the CSG 2010 Economic Summit of the States, Janet Joseph, Vice President for Technology and Strategic Planning at the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, made a presentation on economic opportunities in the new energy economy.

According to a new CSG report, stimulus-funded green jobs grew by 70 percent in the fourth quarter of 2009. CSG’s original report, released in December, found roughly 13,000 green jobs were created or saved from when the Recovery Act was enacted to Sept. 30, 2009.

State eNews Issue #39 | February 3, 2010


President Barack Obama’s State of the Union speech, with its strong jobs and middle-class families themes, seemed to echo the famous Clinton campaign war room posting, “It’s the economy, stupid.”

States are using a variety of tactics to get people back to work through retraining programs, most of which are on community college campuses.  Big enrollment increases, couple with state budget cuts, is leaving many colleges in a fiscal crisis.

While the Recovery Act has made unprecedented investments in clean energy, energy efficiency, and other environmental improvements, a new report by The Council of State Governments finds that in most states the wave of green jobs tied to these investments has yet to arrive.

 

Suggested State Legislation:This Act creates a program to reimburse education costs for residents who obtain an associate degree or a bachelor’s degree in the state, and live, work and pay taxes in the state thereafter.

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