What do natural disasters, the sharing economy and an aging population have in common? These are all policy topics where a basic knowledge of risk management and insurance can help state leaders make better policy decisions. In collaboration with The Griffith Insurance Education Foundation, The Council of State Governments will address these topics and more throughout a four-part webinar series designed to provide public policymakers with a greater understanding of risk management insurance through the lens of emerging issues. This session, the fourth and final session of the series, examines insurance regulation and the role of National Association of Insurance Commissioners, state government insurance programs, market conduct and solvency regulation, and insurance rate and form regulation.

What do natural disasters, the sharing economy and an aging population have in common? These are all policy topics where a basic knowledge of risk management and insurance can help state leaders make better policy decisions. In collaboration with The Griffith Insurance Education Foundation, The Council of State Governments will address these topics and more throughout a four-part webinar series designed to provide public policymakers with a greater understanding of risk management insurance through the lens of emerging issues. Participants in the series will walk away with a solid understanding of risk management and insurance fundamentals, property, casualty, life and health insurance, and insurance regulation and legislation.

What do natural disasters, the sharing economy and an aging population have in common? These are all policy topics where a basic knowledge of risk management and insurance can help state leaders make better policy decisions. In collaboration with The Griffith Insurance Education Foundation, The Council of State Governments addresses these topics and more throughout a four-part webinar series designed to provide public policymakers with a greater understanding of risk management insurance through the lens of emerging issues. Part two of the series focused on property and casualty insurance.

What do natural disasters, the sharing economy and an aging population have in common? These are all policy topics where a basic knowledge of risk management and insurance can help state leaders make better policy decisions. In collaboration with The Griffith Insurance Education Foundation, The Council of State Governments addresses these topics and more throughout a four-part webinar series designed to provide public policymakers with a greater understanding of risk management insurance through the lens of emerging issues. 

The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, or SEC, launched an initiative in 2014 to encourage issuers and underwriters of municipal securities to self-report certain violations of the federal securities laws rather than wait for their violations to be detected. The Municipalities Continuing Disclosure Cooperation, or MCDC, Initiative is intended to address widespread violations of the federal securities laws by municipal issuers and underwriters in connection with certain representations about continuing disclosures in bond offering documents. The SEC began issuing fines and penalties against underwriters in July 2015, and is now turning its attention to issuers.

Telematics—the technology of sending, receiving and storing information relating to vehicles via telecommunication devices—appears likely to have a significant impact on traditional insurance models in the years ahead. Telematics, for example, allows for the measurement of actual driving habits based on a vehicle’s real-time driving data. This non-partisan and non-advocative webinar, presented in collaboration with The Griffith Insurance Education Foundation, examines how the technology works, how telematics is impacting insurance models and products, and how public policymakers are considering the myriad questions and challenges this innovation presents.

Senator David Vitter (R-LA) recently introduced the Small Business Lending Oversight Act of 2016, S. 2992.  This legislation aims to strengthen oversight procedures within the Small Business Administration (SBA)’s 7(a) loan program, which provides small businesses with loans of up to $5 million from bank and non-bank lenders.

This Act permits certain individuals to report the occurrence or suspected occurrence of financial exploitation of qualified adults, defined as a person who is either 60 years of age or older or has a disability as defined under current law and is between the ages of 18 and 59. The Act permits certain individuals to notify an immediate family member, legal guardian, conservator, co-trustee, successor trustee, or agent under power of attorney of the qualified adult if they are of the belief that the qualified adult is, or may become, a victim of financial exploitation. The Act permits certain individuals to refuse to make a disbursement from the account of a qualified adult or an account on which a qualified adult is a beneficiary or beneficial owner if the individual reasonably believes the request will result in financial exploitation

The Act authorizes open-ended credit plans extended to non-commercial borrowers for personal, family, or household purposes. Such loans may be secured or unsecured by personal property, lacking in fixed maturities or designated length of term, and are subject to prepayment of the outstanding balance at any time without penalty.

The U.S. Export-Import Bank may receive a new breath of life after a small group of Republicans joined Democrats in filing a discharge petition Oct. 9 to force a vote in the U.S. House of Representatives that would renew the bank’s charter.

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