In 2015, the U.S. exported over $56 billion in merchandise to the United Kingdom. That represents nearly 4 percent of all U.S. exports and makes the U.K. the fifth largest export market for the U.S. After
hitting a 10-year low in 2013, exports have been on the rise to the U.K. for the past two years, but recent political developments could put those gains at risk.

Looking to the global marketplace for economic development and paying attention to export and import trends is no longer an option for state policymakers—it is a necessity.

CSG Midwest
A fiber optic connection is considered the “gold standard” for quality, high-speed Internet access, and in the Midwest, it’s in pretty short supply.
Except in North Dakota.
In the region’s most sparsely populated state, 60 percent of the households, including those on farms in far-flung areas, have fiber. (That compares to 24 percent in the Midwest, where most of the existing fiber networks serve urban areas.) In all, North Dakota ranks fifth in the nation in fiber access.This is amazing enough, considering many of the obstacles typically cited as responsible for the dearth of high-speed technologies in rural parts of the Midwest — for example, the high costs of serving low-density areas.
But the story of North Dakota’s prominence in fiber access is also a testament to entrepreneurship in the nation’s heartland, and perhaps a model for the rest of the Midwest.
CSG Midwest
Lawmakers in two Midwestern states have given close scrutiny in recent months to a targeted tax credit that has become an increasingly popular policy tool for trying to help entrepreneurs and startup companies. Known as “angel investor” tax credits, these incentives encourage investment in early-stage firms by mitigating some of the potential loss if a company fails. Most states in the Midwest have some form of this tax credit.

In 2015, the U.S. exported over $56 billion in merchandise to the United Kingdom. That represents nearly 4 percent of all U.S. exports and makes the U.K. the fifth largest export market for the U.S. After hitting a 10 year low in 2013, exports have been on the rise to the U.K. for the past two years. However, those gains could be in jeopardy following the U.K.’s recent vote to leave the European Union, also known as “Brexit”. On a state-by-state basis, exports to the U.K. range from less than one percent of total exports in six states (Alaska, Hawaii, Nebraska, New Mexico, North Dakota and South Dakota) to a high of 22.9 percent in Utah and 16.3 percent in Delaware.

Following the June 23 vote by the United Kingdom to leave the European Union, there are a number of looming economic impacts not only for European nations, but for the states on this side of the Atlantic that sold $56 billion worth of goods to the UK in 2015. 

Puerto Rico, home of 3.5 million American citizens, is struggling to handle over $72 billion in debt. For many years, the U.S. territory borrowed money by issuing municipal bonds to compensate for declining government revenue. But now Puerto Rico cannot afford to pay back their investors. The territory cannot file for Chapter 9...

A recent report released by the Economic Innovation Group paints a lopsided picture of how the United States has recovered from the Great Recession of 2007-08.  According to the study, job growth and new business formation in the post-recessionary period has been heavily concentrated in roughly 70 counties and almost exclusively clustered in large metropolitan regions. Twenty counties, which account for less than one percent of roughly 3,100 counties in the U.S., were home to half of new business startups between 2010 and 2014. Likewise, half of the new jobs created in the same time period were located in only 73 counties.

The 6th Annual CSG Transportation Leaders Policy Academy in Washington, D.C. wrapped up on May 20 with a panel discussion on transit-oriented development and building communities. Panelists included Marco Li Mandri, the President of California-based New City America, a company that works on business district revitalization efforts around the country; Angela Fox, the president and CEO of the Crystal City, Virginia Business Improvement District; and Michael Stevens, president of the Capitol Riverfront Business Improvement District in Washington, which was the home base for this year’s policy academy. They discussed the evolving responsibilities of state legislation-enabled business improvement districts in managing neighborhoods around transit hubs and the roles played by retail, restaurants, residential, office space, parks, sports facilities and transit in ensuring their success. This page includes extended excerpts of their remarks from the panel discussion, links to PowerPoint presentations and related reading and photos from both the panel and a subsequent tour of the Capitol Riverfront BID.

Ed Mortimer is executive director of transportation infrastructure at the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and leads the Americans for Transportation Mobility, or ATM, Coalition as its executive director. He was among the presenters at a policy roundtable CSG hosted on May 19 as part of the 6th Annual CSG Transportation Leaders Policy Academy in Washington. He spoke about the importance of infrastructure to the business community, the importance of Congress seeing progress on transportation projects under the FAST Act, the importance of maintaining existing infrastructure and efforts to consolidate federal transportation programs.

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