Workforce Development: 5 Things to Know

1. Employment and Training Administration (ETA) Publishes Guidance on Registered Apprenticeship Provisions and Opportunities in the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA)
2. ETA Releases Planning Estimate for WIOA Youth, Adult, and Dislocated worker Program Allotments for Program Year 2017
3. US Department of Labor Awards $65 Million to Help Unemployed Workers with Job Searches, Support Integrity of the Unemployment Insurance Program

State WIOA Plans are now available to be viewed online.

What is WIOA?

The Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act, also known as WIOA, was signed in July 2014 and is a major reform of the public workforce system.  The WIOA supersedes the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 and amends the Adult Education and Family Literacy Act, the Wagner-Peyser Act, and the Rehabilitation Act of 1973.  The WIOA requires states to...

Are public pension plans trading off long-term stability for a less hair-raising sticker price for state governments today? A new report from the Rockefeller Institute of Government answers that question and takes a closer look at the difficult choices those running public pension funds have had to make over the last three decades, and what those choices mean for the future fiscal stability of states. 

A new study from the Commonwealth Fund finds that repeal of two major federal spending provisions of the Affordable Care Act, insurance premium tax credits and the expansion of Medicaid, would ultimately lead to the loss of 2.6 million jobs in 2019. The data, generated by researchers at George Washington, breaks down the impact of repeal for each state. California would lose the most jobs, 334,000 their multistate economic forecasting model suggests, and Wyoming the least with 4,000 jobs lost.

Employment is the most direct and cost-effective means to empower individuals to achieve independence, economic self-sufficiency, and a sense of dignity and self-worth. This FREE CSG eCademy webcast focuses on employer practices and state policies that address the hiring, retention and re-entry of people with disabilities in the workplace. This is the final webcast in a four-part series presented by the National Task Force on Workforce Development for People with Disabilities, in partnership with the U.S. Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy.

CSG Midwest
Imagine being in your mid- to late 20s and walking into a workplace for the very first time as an employee. For many of today’s young Americans, this delayed entry into the workforce has become a harsh reality. During the Great Recession, unemployment rates soared for all age groups. 
But young people were hit particularly hard: In April 2010, the jobless rate for people between the ages of 16 and 24 reached a record high of nearly 20 percent. Today, youth unemployment in the United States still tops 10 percent, more than double the overall jobless rate. 

This FREE CSG eCademy webcast centered on employment-related supports for individuals with disabilities with particular focus on issues of transportation and technology, including assistive technology and emerging technologies. In addition, experts discussed other employment supports such as health care, personal assistance services and housing. This is the third webcast in a four-part series presented by the National Task Force on Workforce Development for People with Disabilities in partnership with the U.S. Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy.

A Texas federal district court issued a nationwide injunction preventing new overtime rules from going into effect. These rules would have made it more likely states and local governments would have had to pay more employees overtime.

Twenty-one states and a number of business organizations sued the Department of Labor. The rules were to go into effect on December 1, 2016.

An update to the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) will increase the threshold for workers receiving overtime pay. Under the new rule, salaried employees who make less than $47,476 a year will be able to receive time-and-a-half pay when they work more than forty hours a week. With existing FLSA regulations, only salaried employees making under $23,660 a year and hourly workers are eligible for overtime protections.

The Kentucky Supreme Court ruled on October 20th that cities do not have the authority to raise the minimum wage standard.

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