In March 2015, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy wrote a concurring opinion for Direct Marketing Association v. Brohl stating that the “legal system should find an appropriate case for this Court to re-examine Quill.” Two lawsuits out of South Dakota and Alabama might be exactly the case Kennedy had in mind. 

In the last month, legislation to eliminate the so-called “tampon tax” has been passed in New York, Connecticut and Illinois. The push to exempt tampons, pads, and other feminine hygiene products from state sales taxes has come amid criticism that the tax unfairly affects women. Supporters argue that menstrual products should be treated like other medical necessities, which are currently tax exempt in most states.

According to the National Association of State Budget Officers, most states (46) will start their fiscal year on January 1, 2016. Most states (39) have enacted their budgets for the new fiscal year, including 16 states that operate on a biennial budget and who passed their fiscal year 2017 budgets last year. That leaves 11 states that have yet to enact a budget for 2017: Alaska, California, Delaware, Illinois, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island and West Virginia.

An internet retailer has filed suit against Alabama claiming its new rule requiring all retailers who sell more than $250,000 in goods annually must collect sales tax—regardless of whether the retailer has a physical presence in the state—is unconstitutional.

This lawsuit is the second of its kind. Earlier this spring a lawsuit was filed against South Dakota challenging its law, which is similar to Alabama’s rule.

Last March, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy wrote a concurring opinion stating that the “legal system should find an appropriate case for this court to re-examine Quill.”

San Francisco startup Airbnb is a vital part of what’s known as the sharing economy as it connects property owners with travelers seeking unique travel accommodations. As some states find themselves in budgetary binds, looking to Airbnb and similar businesses for additional revenue may prove a popular option. As of July 1, 2016, ten states require Airbnb to collect and remit applicable state lodging and sales taxes.

Chapter 7 of the 2016 Book of the States contains the following articles and tables:

Researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health say yes, using a sophisticated microsimulation model to predict impacts of the tax. In a report released last month, the Harvard researchers calculated the proposed soda tax in Philadelphia would prevent 2,280 cases of diabetes each year once the tax is fully implemented. The Harvard microsimulation model assumes lower consumption if the city implements the three cents tax per ounce of sugar-sweetened beverage, a 49 percent price increase.

On May 1, Puerto Rico defaulted on a $422 million bond payment to little fanfare. Congress now has a brief window to address the commonwealth’s lack of options before a $2 billion payment is due July 1—a default that would likely not pass so quietly.

For state budgets, every dollar counts. But this is perhaps even more so the case at a time when state economies are still recovering from the Great Recession. That’s why New Mexico State Auditor Tim Keller decided to take a closer look at state accounts when he was elected in 2014. In February, the New Mexico Office of the State Auditor released the second annual Fund Balance Report, which focuses on unspent funds in state government accounts that don’t automatically revert to the state’s general fund. In New Mexico, Keller took a look at unspent funds across all state agencies that didn’t automatically revert back to the general fund. And the results, he said, were somewhat surprising. “The dollars were much higher than anyone expected.”

States may reap some revenue rewards following the rollout of new rules by the U.S. Treasury Department related to corporate income taxes. On April 4, 2016, the U.S. Treasury Department announced the issuance of new regulations that are intended to make it more difficult for companies to pursue corporate inversions—the practice used by companies to reincorporate overseas in order to reduce their tax burden on income earned abroad—and to reduce subsequent profits for tax purposes through a tactic called earnings stripping. Earnings stripping is a technique employed by companies after a corporate inversion to minimize U.S. tax obligations by transferring debt to a foreign parent company and declaring the interest on the debt as a deduction.