Recognizing the challenge of financing and completing needed infrastructure projects, several states in 2016 approved legislation that allows them to enter into public-private partnerships (P3s). But P3 legislation has not always guaranteed quick success in moving projects forward and some states without P3 legislation have been able to explore P3s nonetheless. A number of other states have taken steps in recent years to clarify their goals and procedures with regards to P3 projects. These actions are taking place as the universe of P3 infrastructure projects around the country is expanding well beyond toll roads.

For many years synonymous with car culture and some of the nation’s worst traffic, the city of Los Angeles is in the midst of what city leaders hope will be an extended period of investment in public transit that is already transforming how Los Angelenos live, work and play.  

When U.S. Secretary of Transportation Anthony Foxx finished his remarks at the recent InfraAmericas conference on public-private partnerships, or P3s, in New York City, Kentucky state Rep. Leslie Combs was first to the microphone for the Q&A. “We just passed P3 legislation in Kentucky,” said Combs, who this spring authored the legislation that allows Kentucky, like 33 other states, Puerto Rico and the District of Columbia, to enter into P3s to build infrastructure projects.

While there may be a long-term federal surface transportation bill in place and while many states have been addressing their own transportation needs in recent years, there is still much work left to do and a variety of key questions on the horizon.

That was the message from speakers at the 6th annual CSG Transportation Leaders Policy Academy held May 18-20 in Washington, D.C. Ten state legislators from across the country, chosen in consultation with CSG regional staff and Associates, attended the event, which took place against the backdrop of Infrastructure Week, a week of infrastructure-themed events in the nation’s capital and elsewhere.

Next month, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) is expected to issue what is being billed as a model state policy as well as “best-practice guidance to industry on establishing principles of safe operation for fully autonomous vehicles.” Then, the American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators (AAMVA) will follow suit with more detailed guidelines and materials in support of the policy this fall. Those two documents are likely to kick off what many believe will be a busy couple of years at the state and federal levels in determining how driverless vehicles will take the roads and the complex policy changes that may be needed to accommodate them. But while many states anxiously await that guidance, a couple are already making moves to accelerate the autonomous future in significant ways.

The 6th Annual CSG Transportation Leaders Policy Academy in Washington, D.C. wrapped up on May 20 with a panel discussion on transit-oriented development and building communities. Panelists included Marco Li Mandri, the President of California-based New City America, a company that works on business district revitalization efforts around the country; Angela Fox, the president and CEO of the Crystal City, Virginia Business Improvement District; and Michael Stevens, president of the Capitol Riverfront Business Improvement District in Washington, which was the home base for this year’s policy academy. They discussed the evolving responsibilities of state legislation-enabled business improvement districts in managing neighborhoods around transit hubs and the roles played by retail, restaurants, residential, office space, parks, sports facilities and transit in ensuring their success. This page includes extended excerpts of their remarks from the panel discussion, links to PowerPoint presentations and related reading and photos from both the panel and a subsequent tour of the Capitol Riverfront BID.

Aubrey Layne is the secretary of transportation for the Commonwealth of Virginia and serves as the 2016 vice-chair of the CSG Transportation Public Policy Committee. He delivered a keynote address May 19 to state legislators from around the country attending the 6th Annual CSG Transportation Leaders Policy Academy in Washington, D.C. He spoke about the Commonwealth’s recent efforts to reform its processes around transportation project prioritization and public-private partnerships.

Ten state legislators from around the country, chosen in consultation with the CSG regions, attended the 6th Annual CSG Transportation Leaders Policy Academy May 18-20, 2016 in Washington, D.C. The academy took place against the backdrop of Infrastructure Week, a week of infrastructure-themed events in the National’s Capital and elsewhere. Attendees had the opportunity to participate in Infrastructure Advocacy Day on Capitol Hill and to meet with officials at the U.S. Department of Transportation. They took part in a policy roundtable with stakeholders and experts from such organizations as the American Society of Civil Engineers, the American Road and Transportation Builders Association, the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, Transportation for America, the Eno Center for Transportation and the Alliance for Innovation and Infrastructure. In addition, they attended briefings on state regulation of rideshare companies, autonomous and connected vehicle technologies and transit-oriented development. The group also toured the area around Navy Yard, a rapidly developing, transit-centric D.C. neighborhood that is home to Nationals Baseball Park and the U.S. DOT headquarters. And they heard remarks from Virginia Secretary of Transportation Aubrey Layne about the commonwealth’s efforts to reform its processes for transportation project selection and public-private partnership deployment. This page includes photos from the three-day academy, the complete agenda for the event and links to web pages where you can read extended excerpts of remarks from many of the speakers, view their PowerPoint presentations and find additional materials.

Democratic leaders in the Maryland General Assembly have introduced legislation (SB 908) being viewed as an effort to restrict the power of the governor to decide which transportation projects to fund. The legislation comes in the wake of Gov. Larry Hogan’s decision last summer to cancel a long-in-the-works plan for a light rail project in Baltimore. But Maryland may also be looking to follow in the footsteps of several states, including neighboring Virginia, that have taken a close look at their project selection processes in recent years as a means to increase transparency, improve accountability and shore up the public trust that scarce transportation dollars are being spent wisely.

Efforts around the country to revitalize downtowns and create economically vital and aesthetically pleasing communities, often centered on transit hubs, have created a greater need for a private-public entity that can manage these areas to ensure their long-term sustainability. While most states have laws on the books to enable these special districts, some experts say they are still too difficult to establish and that some of the decades-old laws may need to evolve to reflect the expanding mission of these districts and the changing nature of the communities they serve.

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