America's largest supermarket chain, Cincinnati-based Kroger, recently announced it would install 225 electric vehicle (EV) charging stations at 125 stores across California and Arizona according to an article in the Los Angeles Times.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), recently released its 2011 Fisheries of the United States Report which found that commercial and recreational fish catches were at their highest levels since 1994. 

CSG this week issues a new brief in our Capitol Research series entitled “Transit-Oriented Development.” Using the possibility of development around future high-speed rail stations as a jumping off point, it examines the policy options available to states to try to shape how that development occurs. While high-speed rail has suffered a number of political setbacks in recent months, it remains on track in some parts of the country. But regardless of whether high-speed rail is coming to your state any time soon, there is a great deal of useful information in the brief about the role states can play in shaping the kinds of communities Americans say they want and that best serve our citizens, the environment and the economy. I encourage you to read the brief, which examines the benefits of transit-oriented development, the role of state governments in encouraging it, and the experiences of California and many other states in adopting related policies. If the brief piques your interest, there is an abundance of other worthwhile reading I can point you toward as well.

I’ve written a fair amount over the last year or so about the intersection of transportation and the environment in public policy, about Sustainable Communities and Smart Growth, about Climate Change and Transportation and about Green Transportation. Several new reports on related issues have come across my desk in recent weeks. Here’s a rundown.

Two years ago, Massachusetts Supreme Court Chief Justice Robert Mulligan was concerned the trial courts in his state weren’t addressing environmental sustainability.

So he put together the Trial Court Energy Task Force, better known as the Green Team.

NOW, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, CSG expresses its support and commitment to promoting partnerships with state, federal, local and tribal governmental entities, as well as non-governmental organizations, academia and industry to promote and advance sustainability.