CSG South

Despite more than 20 years of efforts to address the issue of waste tires nationwide, large illegal stockpiles persist. In a number of reported incidents where stockpiles have caught on fire, mitigation of the site has taken up to nine years and $22 million to complete. Remediation of large illegal stockpiles has been reported to take more than five years to complete. While the tracking and disposal of waste tires continue to present challenges, legislatures in the states comprising the Southern Legislative Conference of The Council of State Governments have been focusing on this problem, creating legislation and devising mechanisms to address this problem, since 1989.

Tire dumps can attract rodents and mosquitoes, act as vectors for disease, and are a serious fire hazard. When tires catch fire, contaminants in the burning material can run off into creeks and pollute groundwater. These fires also can cause significant air pollution.

This SLC Regional Resource outlines some of the key criteria contained in the SLC states' waste tire disposal laws and rules, provides an overview of state waste tire laws and concludes with an assessment of best practices undertaken by states in the region.

The New Jersey Senate Environment Committee recently approved legislation by a vote of 4-0 that would provide consumers a 5 cent rebate for each reusable shopping bag in a purchase as well as 5 cent penalty for each plastic bag needed at check out. The bill was modeled on a plastic bag tax and reusable bag incentive structure used in Washington D.C., which proponents have argued has reduced the amount of plastic bags found in the Anacostia River by 60 percent.