All used nuclear fuel produced by the U.S. nuclear energy industry in the past 50 years—approximately 72,000 metric tons—if stacked end-to-end would cover an area the size of a football field to a depth of about seven yards. Although the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 established a national program for the safe, permanent disposal of highly radioactive waste, currently there is no disposal site in the United States for spent rods from the more than 100 operating commercial nuclear reactors across the country. As the nation moves to reduce carbon emissions, nuclear energy may become an increasingly important element in the stability of the U.S. power system, intensifying the need for a permanent solution to spent fuel storage. This free webinar reviews current storage practices and explore challenges and opportunities for a permanent storage solution for the nation’s high-level radioactive spent fuel.

The electric ratepayers in dozens of states have been charged billions to build a site to store nuclear waste. As waste continues to be generated and stored on-site at power plants,   the President's Blue Ribbon Panel on America's Nuclear Future has suggested new strategies to manage spent fuel and create sites for interim storage for waste.
 

Proposed rules by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) would place more emphasis on the role of states in ensuring the security of shipments of spent nuclear fuel. These rules, as well as other security issues involving spent-fuel shipments through the region, were prominent on the spring meeting agenda of the CSG Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee. This group of state officials and legislators met in May in conjunction with the annual meeting of the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Transportation Stakeholders Forum (NTSF).

A plan to ship radioactive waste through the Great Lakes has received a flurry of criticism over the past year, but in February, it secured the approval of a key federal regulatory commission in Canada.

A decades-old project to store the nation's nuclear waste at Nevada's Yucca Mountain has been de-funded, leaving the future of federal policy up in the air.

Nearly 20 percent of our nation's electricity is generated by nuclear energy.  Nuclear energy is expected to play a key role in mitigating climate change.

BE IT NOW THEREFORE RESOLVED, that CSG urges the federal government to honor its obligations under the NWPA by continuing (pursuing) the development of a national repository at Yucca Mountain in Nevada, contingent on NRC licensing approval; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that CSG urges Congress to provide DOE and the NRC sufficient funding to carry out their obligations under the NWPA and to fully fund interactions between these agencies and the state governments affected by federal radioactive waste management and transportation activities, including full funding for the state regional transportation projects.