Oregon voters will decide Nov. 4 whether to overturn a state law that grants driver’s cards to Oregonians who can’t prove legal residency. The legislature passed the bill in 2013, but opponents of the law gathered enough signatures to send the measure to the polls as a ballot initiative. The outcome—if enough people oppose the law—could stop it dead in its tracks. 

Disasters demand attention. They don’t care about government shutdowns, continuing resolutions or sequestration. Political ideology and party partisanship are immaterial to them. Disasters also don’t discriminate. They occur in red states, in blue states and every shade in between. Borders drawn on a map make no difference. So, whether it’s a tornado in Moore, Okla., a chemical spill in West Virginia or wildfires in Colorado, there are undeniable realities when it comes to disasters. 1) They will occur. 2) Some people will need help. 3) Communities will want to recover. Because disasters can be arbitrary and capricious, the only way to truly manage them is to learn from the last one, while mitigating and preparing to the best of one’s ability for the next event. At the end of the day, that determines success or failure, life or death. For disasters, all the rest are just details.

NEMA is very proud to release the first-ever report tracing the history of EMAC and its impact on national mutual aid policy and operations. A state-driven solution, EMAC stands as a tested and proven success story and an example of what determined individuals can accomplish when working together to make a difference for the nation.

ANCHORAGE, ALASKA—Nicholas Burns, a professor at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government and former adviser to four U.S. presidents, thinks the world is in pretty bad shape right now. That’s a sobering thought considering he began his career in public service during the height of the Cold War....

NOW, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that The Council of State Governments supports the establishment of the Recognition of EMS Personnel Licensure Compact (REPLICA) and encourages its member jurisdictions to consider the new interstate agreement as an innovative policy solution to the challenge of interstate EMS personnel emergency and life-saving operations.

The CSG West Canada Relations Committee discussed the Arctic Council and its importance to both the U.S. and Canada. Members also discussed how states and provinces play a role in mitigating the effects of climate change, as well as in emergencies such as fires and floods, independently and collaboratively through memorandums of understanding and compacts.

In Wood v. Moss the Court will decide whether Secret Service agents engaged in unconstitutional viewpoint discrimination when they moved anti-Bush protesters about one block further from the President than pro-Bush demonstrators.  The Court also will decide whether the lower court evaluated the viewpoint discrimination claim at too high a level of generality when determining whether the agents should have been granted qualified immunity.  The State and Local Legal Center (SLLC) filed an amicus brief in this case.  

NOW, THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that The Council of State Governments endorses the Aerospace States Association’s policy paper “UAS Privacy Concerns” addressing unmanned aircraft systems privacy concerns; and BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that The Council of State Governments supports the Federal Aviation Administration-monitored use of UAS as emerging technologies with a potential economic benefit for states.

When Hurricane Sandy hit the mid-Atlantic and East Coast in late October 2012, it not only killed more than 200 people and caused tens of billions of dollars in damage. It altered the way this country manages disasters. Congress passed the Sandy Recovery Improvement Act of 2013 in late January. In addition to providing almost $51 billion for recovery and other projects, it amended the Stafford Act and key aspects of federal disaster assistance programs. Beyond the legislation, the hurricane also provoked debate on the underfunded National Flood Insurance Program, climate change and its impact on rising sea levels, the growing economic losses from disasters, community resiliency and rebuilding stronger versus not re-building at all. The country hasn’t witnessed this kind of national discourse related to a natural disaster since Hurricane Katrina in 2005. Yet even as these discussions took place, the harsh undercurrent of fiscal battles, partisan politics and citizens who require help persisted. Together, they have created an intense struggle that won’t be resolved any time soon.
 

Storms and disasters are going to happen in every state sooner or later. A plan is the most important thing to help save lives and minimize damage, energy experts say.

Storms and disasters are going to happen in every state sooner or later. A plan is the most important thing to help save lives and minimize damage, energy experts say.

Pages