The Act requires that in the event of a data security breach information holders are to contact anyone whose data may have been accessed by an unauthorized person. Additionally, this Act requires that cloud computing service providers will not process student data without parental permission.

The Act provides that a person convicted of rape in which a child was born as a result of the offense shall lose parental rights, visitation rights, and rights of inheritance with respect to that child; provides for an exception at the request of the mother, and provides that a court shall impose on obligation of child support against the offender unless waived by the mother and, if applicable, a public agency supporting the child.

Several states have adopted registries to identify certain caregivers involved in adult abuse cases.

The Act makes “non‐consensual dissemination of private sexual images,” otherwise known as “revenge porn” a Class 4 felony. It is a crime to knowingly post sexually explicit photos, video, voice recordings, etc. of another person online without the person’s consent. Revenge porn is a growing problem due to increased use of social media and other technology. Posts are sexual exploitation and often include names, addresses, e‐mail addresses and other information that compromises the safety of victims and their families. The Act includes exceptions for telecommunications and law enforcement and voluntary exposure in public or commercial settings.

The UAPRHT is a comprehensive law directed against human trafficking. It provides the three components necessary for ending human trafficking: comprehensive criminal penalties; protections for human-trafficking victims; and public awareness and prevention methods.

The Act allows non-violent crimes committed by victims of human trafficking to be expunged. Victims charged with non-violent offenses may make a motion in the court to expunge the offense after 60 days of being charged. If the court finds that the offense occurred because the individual was a victim of human trafficking the charges may be dismissed with prejudice.

The Act allows the Department of Public Safety (DPS) to establish a program to alert the public when a hit-and-run accident involving serious bodily injury or death occurs and law enforcement needs assistance in locating the suspect's vehicle.

In an 8-1 decision in Kansas v. Carr, the United States Supreme Court reversed the Kansas Supreme Court’s ruling overturning a jury’s death sentence for the Carr brothers and Sidney Gleason in an unrelated murder. Reginald and Jonathan Carr were convicted of killing four people in the “Wichita Massacre”; one intended victim survived because her hair clip deflected the bullet.  

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In Hurst v. Florida the Supreme Court ruled 8-1 that Florida’s death penalty sentencing scheme is unconstitutional because it allows the judge, instead of requiring the jury, to impose the death sentence.

In 2000 in Apprendi v. New Jersey the Court held that any factual determination that exposes a defendant to a punishment greater than that authorized by a jury’s guilty verdict must be determined by the jury. In Ring v. Arizona (2002) the Court held that Arizona’s capital sentencing scheme violated Apprendi because it allowed the judge to find facts necessary to impose the death sentence.

Florida’s scheme worked similar to Arizona’s. A jury verdict for first-degree murder would result in life in prison without parole unless a judge finds facts supporting a death sentence. But in Florida, unlike Arizona, the jury attends the sentencing evidentiary hearing and renders an “advisory verdict.” The jury does not have to specify any factual basis for its recommendation but the judge must give it “great weight.”

All 50 states have adopted implied consent laws requiring motorists as a condition of driving in the state to consent to a blood alcohol content (BAC) test if they are suspected of drunk-driving.

The Supreme Court will decide whether state statutes criminalizing a person’s refusal to take a chemical BAC test where police have not obtained a warrant are unconstitutional. Thirteen states criminalize the refusal to take a warrantless BAC test. 

In Missouri v. McNeely (2013) the Supreme Court held that police generally have to obtain a warrant to conduct a BAC. So the argument goes, it is unconstitutional to criminalize the refusal to take a BAC test if a warrant was required to conduct the test but not obtained.

The three decisions that the Supreme Court has agreed to review all upheld the state statutes.

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