The U.S. spends more on health care than any other country and that has a big impact on jobs in the health care field. Employment in the health care field has grown significantly in recent years and will likely continue to grow at a strong pace in the next decade.

A long sought-after pathway for medical doctors to treat patients across state lines moved one step closer to reality with the inaugural meeting of the Interstate Medical Licensure Compact Commission—or IMLC—held Oct. 27-28 in Chicago.

This Act enacts the Interstate Medical Licensure Compact. The compact: Becomes effective when adopted by seven states; Creates an interstate commission comprised of two representatives from each member state to oversee operation of the compact; Provides for physicians licensed in one compact state to obtain an expedited license in another compact state; Directs the commission to maintain a database of licensed physicians, and disciplinary records involving licensed physicians, from compact states; Provides for joint investigations and disciplinary actions; Authorizes the commission to levy and collect an assessment on member states to cover the cost of commission operations, and provides civil immunity for commission representatives and employees; Reserves member states’ rights to determine eligibility for physician licensure, license fees, grounds for discipline and continuing education requirements.

Telehealth is one of the fastest growing sectors within the health care industry. Nurses are increasingly being asked to deliver care through electronic means, offering opportunities for better patient care regardless of geographic boundaries. The NLC is a state-based licensure model that facilitates innovative care models by allowing nurses to legally deliver that care to patients through a multistate license. The NLC also has economic benefits, as it facilitates and expedites the hiring process for employers in their state, by enabling them to verify licenses online and to recruit from other states without having to go through the entire endorsement process. The NLC reduces licensure fees for nurses who practice in more than one state, eliminates unnecessary duplicative license procedures, reduces a nurse’s ability to move to another state to avoid a disciplinary action, and provides more expedient access to nurses in times of national crises. In the face of calls for the federal government to address health care licensing nationally, the NLC also offers a state-based solution to the claims that licensure is a barrier to interstate practice.

CSG Director of Health Policy Debra Miller outlines the top five issues in health policy for 2015, including Medicaid expansion, growing the health workforce, integrating health and human services, long-term care, and mental health and substance abuse. 

The FBI has been using fingerprints to link perpetrators and crimes since at least 1924 and switched over to using computers to track fingerprints in October 1980. Since July 1999, the FBI has been using the Integrated Automated Fingerprint Identification System, the largest fingerprint database in the world.2 Increasingly, state laws require fingerprint-based criminal background checks for licensure of various health professions.

Several medical professions have been working with CSG’s National Center on Interstate Compacts to explore the use of compacts to promote license portability to ensure access to high quality health care. These efforts have the potential to help facilitate telemedicine and widen access to a variety of medical services. Licensing compacts also provide a mechanism to ensure state regulatory agencies maintain their licensing and disciplinary authority. This session featured a discussion about the proposed compacts and their potential to enhance access to medical care across the states.

Several medical professions have been working with CSG’s National Center on Interstate Compacts to explore the use of compacts to promote license portability to ensure access to high quality health care. These efforts have the potential to help facilitate telemedicine and widen access to a variety of medical services. Licensing compacts also provide a mechanism to ensure state regulatory agencies maintain their licensing and disciplinary authority. This session featured a discussion about the proposed compacts and their potential to enhance access to medical care across the states.

The bad news is a lot of people across the country can’t get access to appropriate and timely dental care. The good news is state policymakers can help improve the situation.
That was the...

Maine became the third state this year where dental therapists, a mid-level provider similar to physician assistants or nurse practitioners on the medical team, can help dentists expand care. Alaska and Minnesota already have a similar dental care provider. Dental hygiene therapists, as they are called in Maine, will be able to practice in the state and receive reimbursements from Medicaid and all other insurance carriers after Oct.1, 2015.

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