Inmates in correctional facilities have higher rates of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections than the general population. State and local corrections, public health and community-based programs are helping inmates get tested and obtain treatment for HIV and other infections.  Five southern states have higher rates than the national average of inmates living with HIV infections. 

Inmates in state prisons and jails have higher rates of HIV and STIs than the general population.  Although inmates are usually infected prior to incarceration, they are often first diagnosed by correctional health services due to lack of access to health care and other factors.  

Inmates in state prisons and jails have higher rates of HIV and STIs than the general population.  Inmates are usually infected prior to incarceration, but due to lack of access to health care and other factors they are often first diagnosed by correctional health services.  To stop the spread of infections in communities when inmates are released, state and local corrections, public health and community-based programs are collaborating to help inmates get tested and access  treatment for HIV and other STIs—both before and after release.

A new national strategy to combat HIV/AIDS released this week refocuses current efforts by several federal agencies, integrates Affordable Care Act programs, and provides targeted funding for community organizations.  

As of 2008, about 450 state prisoners in Illinois were living with HIV.

Most of these inmates have one thing in common: They will eventually be released from prison. About 85 percent of those released will end up in the Chicago area, according to the Illinois Department of Public Health.

Nearly half of the inmates in New York’s prisons return to the community each year. New York was also one of three states that housed nearly half the 20,000 state prisoners across the country who had HIV or confirmed AIDS. Correctional health care is not only good for the health of inmates and correctional staff—it’s also about preventing the spread of infections to their families and communities when prisoners are released.

It is estimated over a million people in the United States, and almost 40 million people worldwide are currently living with HIV. These alarming statistics and how quickly the virus continues to spread worldwide have pushed HIV and AIDS to the top of the list of healthcare priorities in the United States.  Click on a state to download a PDF issue brief with specific state data on these diseases as well as the state’s policies related to HIV testing, expedited partner therapy and sexual health education.

Expedited partner therapy allows clinicians to treat the sex partners of patients diagnosed with chlamydia or gonorrhea prior to evaluating the partners, under certain conditions. Innovative and cost–effective, expedited partner therapy is legal in 22 states and is an increasingly important state prevention policy to reduce infections and their consequences, including infertility.

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Expedited Partner Therapy (EPT), a cost-effective policy for treatment of curable sexually transmitted diseases, is legal in 23 states. EPT is one approach to treating sexual partners of patients diagnosed with chlamydia or gonorrhea infections, where patients provide treatment directly to their partners.

In response to teen sexual risk behaviors, 35 states have adopted some sort of sex or STD/HIV education. States' statistics are included. 

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