Human papillomavirus, known as HPV, is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States and a principal cause of cervical cancer. The Food and Drug Administration has approved, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has recommended, two HPV vaccinesCervarix and Gardasil. Both prevent certain types of HPV that cause cervical cancer. Since the vaccine was introduced in 2006, the prevalence of the vaccine-type HPV has dropped by 56 percent. 

 

Stateline Midwest ~ October 2012

 
More of the nation’s teenagers are getting immunized against diseases such as meningitis and diphtheria, but U.S. vaccination rates also show wide variances among the states. In addition, federal data show little progress in the percentage of girls receiving the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine.
“We are very concerned about plateauing in HPV vaccination rates,” says Dr. Melinda Wharton of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

According to CDC data, less than half of American middle school students received sex education in 11 core topic areas, while about 4 out 5 high school students received sex education in 8 core topic areas. Sex education is mandated in 21 states and Washington, D.C. State laws in 26 states require abstinence be stressed and in 11 states abstinence must be covered in the curriculum. Twelve states have passed laws that require medically accurate information be provided in sex education classes. 

Expedited partner therapy is a recommended option for treating sexually transmitted diseases. Typically when a patient tests positive for a STD they are treated with an antibiotic. EPT enables healthcare clinicians to provide patients with either antibiotics or prescriptions for antibiotics for their sexual partner without a visit by the partner to a health care center.

More than half of girls ages 13 through 17 in 23 states have received one or more doses of HPV vaccine despite the absence of state mandates.  New vaccination recommendations include boys.

Each year, 19 million Americans are newly diagnosed with sexually transmitted diseases--and nearly half occur in young people ages 15 to 24. However, less than half of those at risk of these diseases--which includes HIV, the infection that can lead to AIDS--are tested for the infections. New CSG state profiles highlight effective state policies recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to address sexual health and prevention of sexually transmitted diseases. 

CSG state policy profiles on sexual health and prevention provide the latest statistics for each state and Puerto Rico on HIV/AIDS, sexually transmitted infections and teen pregnancy.

But more significantly, the profiles provide answers to the question "what can be done?" Effective state policies recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are highlighted. Each state's profile reviews whether policies have been implemented in line with these recommendations.

The CSG state profiles are the place for state decision makers to get up-to-date statistics and analysis of research-proven state actions to prevent HIV/AIDS, STIs and teen pregnancy.

CSG state policy profiles on sexual health and prevention provide the latest statistics for each state and Puerto Rico on HIV/AIDS, sexually transmitted infections and teen pregnancy.

But more significantly, the profiles provide answers to the question "what can be done?" Effective state policies recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are highlighted. Each state's profile reviews whether policies have been implemented in line with these recommendations.

The CSG state profiles are the place for state decision makers to get up-to-date statistics and analysis of research-proven state actions to prevent HIV/AIDS, STIs and teen pregnancy.

The rates of AIDS diagnoses vary greatly among the states as well as across ethnic and racial lines.  African-Americans are 10 times more likely to be diagnosed with AIDS than Whites and three times more likely than Hispanics/Latinos. Regional  rates of AIDS diagnoses varied widely, with the rates per 100,000 adults and adolescents in the South (13.3) and East (13.2) double the rates in the West (6.4) and Midwest (5.8) regions.  

At a special session during the CSG-South 65th annual conference in Memphis, Tenn., legislators heard from speakers about the belt of HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted infections in the South. The meeting was sponsored by the Centers for Diseases Control and Prevention cooperative agreement with CSG.

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