CSG Midwest
The story of outmigration from the Midwest to other parts of the country is as old as the advent and widespread use of home air conditioning. So the most recent federal data on trends in domestic migration among states is not surprising: net gains for the South and West at the expense of the nation’s two other regions.

The Supreme Court split 4-4 in United States v. Texas on whether the President’s deferred action immigration program violates federal law. As a result, the Fifth Circuit’s nationwide temporary stay of the program remains in effect. Next, a trial court may rule on whether the program should be permanently stayed.    

The Deferred Action for Parents of Americans (DAPA) program allows certain undocumented immigrants who have lived in the United States for five years and either came here as children or already have children who are U.S. citizens or permanent residents to lawfully stay and work temporarily in the United States. About 5 million people are affected.

Twenty-six states sued the United States. The Fifth Circuit granted them a nationwide temporary injunction preventing the program from going into effect. The states appealed to the Supreme Court on a variety of grounds.  

Now it is as if this case never went to the Supreme Court.

United States v. Texas is about different things for different people. For some it is about keeping families together, for others executive overreach, and for about half of the states it is about “standing” to sue the federal government.   

The legal issue in this case is whether the President’s Deferred Action for Parents of Americans (DAPA) program, which allows certain undocumented immigrants who have US citizen children to stay and work temporarily in the United States, violates federal law.

According to the United Van Lines' 37th Annual Migration Study, which tracks the company’s customers move to and from during the course of the year, Oregon is the top moving destination of 2013. North and South Carolina take up the next two spots on the list, followed by the District of Columbia and South Dakota. Michigan, which was at or near the top of the outbound list for 16 consecutive years, finally appeared in the "balanced" category for 2013. 

The story of the population and economic decline of some of the Midwest’s largest, historically most important cities did not begin in 2000 and will likely not end in 2010.  Nonetheless, data from U.S. Census 2010 are striking in showing the extent of the out-migration from many of this region’s central towns.

In a decade when the U.S. population grew at the smallest rate since the 1930s and the Great Depression, every Midwestern state failed to keep pace with the nation’s 10-year growth rate of 9.7 percent.

The U.S. is undergoing a major demographic revolution that will have major public policy implications across regions and states and within regions and states. Our population is aging, we are becoming more diverse, dramatic migration patterns are occurring and social indicators reveal major challenges ahead.